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Here's how one file looks:

BEGIN_META
    stuff
    to
    discard
END_META
BEGIN_DB
    header
    to
    discard

    data I
    wish to
    extract
 END_DB

I'd like to be able to parse an infinite stream of them all cat'd together, which precludes doing something like re.findall('something useful', '\n'.join(sys.stdin), re.M).

Below is my attempt, but I have to force the generator returned from get_raw_table() so it doesn't quite fit the requirements. Removing the force means you can't test if the returned generator is empty or not, so you cannot see if sys.stdin is empty.

def get_raw_table(it):
    state = 'begin'
    for line in it:
        if line.startswith('BEGIN_DB'):
            state = 'discard'
        elif line.startswith('END_DB'):
            return
        elif state is 'discard' and not line.strip():
            state = 'take'
        elif state is 'take' and line:
            yield line.strip().strip('#').split()

# raw_tables is a list (per file) of lists (per row) of lists (per column)
raw_tables = []
while True:
    result = list(get_raw_table(sys.stdin))
    if result:
        raw_tables.append(result)
    else:
        break
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Something like this might work:

import itertools

def chunks(it):
    while True:
        it = itertools.dropwhile(lambda x: 'BEGIN_DB' not in x, it)
        it = itertools.dropwhile(lambda x: x.strip(), it)
        next(it)
        yield itertools.takewhile(lambda x: 'END_DB' not in x, it)

For example:

src = """
BEGIN_META
    stuff
    to
    discard
END_META
BEGIN_DB
    header
    to
    discard

    1data I
    1wish to
    1extract
 END_DB


BEGIN_META
    stuff
    to
    discard
END_META
BEGIN_DB
    header
    to
    discard

    2data I
    2wish to
    2extract
 END_DB
"""


src = iter(src.splitlines())
for chunk in chunks(src):
    for line in chunk:
        print line.strip()
    print
share|improve this answer
    
Totally my mistake. Great solution. Thank you. –  Cuadue Feb 7 '13 at 19:43

You can separate your functions more programmatically to make your programming logic make more sense and to make your code more modular and flexible. Try to stay away from saying something like

state = "some string"

Because what happens if in the future you want to add something to this module, then you need to know what parameters your variable "state" takes and what happens when it changes values. You're not guaranteed to remember this information and this can set you up for some hassles. Writing functions to mimic this behavior is cleaner and easier to implement.

def read_stdin():
    with sys.stdin as f:
        for line in f:
            yield line

def search_line_for_start_db(line):
    if "BEGIN DB" in line:
        search_db_for_info()

def search_db_for_info()
    while "END_DB" not in new_line: 
        new_line = read_line.next()
        if not new_line.strip():
            # Put your information somewhere
            raw_tables.append(line)

read_line = read_stdin()
raw_tables = []
while True:
    try:
        search_line_for_start_db(read_line.next())
    Except: #Your stdin stream has finished being read
        break #end your program
share|improve this answer
    
oh wait, I see you asked for lazy... –  Greg Feb 7 '13 at 2:48
    
Well, the state is totally local to those 10 or so lines of the function, so I doubt it'll cause confusion. Also, isn't the function read_stdin is identical to iter(sys.stdin) which is identical to sys.stdin itself? –  Cuadue Feb 7 '13 at 18:13
    
ah you're right, haha. thg435 has a way better solution tho –  Greg Feb 7 '13 at 21:20

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