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I'm a bit confused about the usage of Abstract classes in C#. In C++, it makes sense to define a template which classes inheriting the abstract class can follow. But, in C# doesn't Interface serve the same purpose?

True that abstract classes can have default implementation which is not provided by Interfaces. So if implementation doesn't need to be included in base class, is it better to go for Interfaces?

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14 Answers

up vote 17 down vote accepted

I still like to provide a default abstract implementation of an interface, assuming it's a substantial interface (and it makes sense). You never know when you might add something to the interface that has an easy default implementation that could be included and given "for free" to anyone who inherits from the abstract base class.

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+1 I tend to do the same thing. –  Chuck Conway Sep 25 '09 at 1:30
3  
Downvoter care to share why? –  Adam Robinson Sep 27 '09 at 17:37
    
It's really not brave of someone to downvote a post and running away without stating their rational behind it. –  legends2k Feb 25 '10 at 9:39
    
Extension methods allow adding implemented methods to an interface. This removes some(but not all) off the advantages of an abstract class. –  CodesInChaos Oct 17 '10 at 19:47
2  
@CodeInChaos: While extension methods can account for some use-cases for abstract classes vs. interfaces, they are not a replacement. Extension methods don't allow polymorphism, require their declaring namespace to be either the same as the consuming code or in an explicit using (VB Includes) declaration, and cannot access any non-public members. Extension methods allow you to more easily define functionality that you could otherwise duplicate outside of the class. –  Adam Robinson Oct 17 '10 at 20:48
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This CodeProject article has a lot of information on the difference between the two including a table comparing and contrasting the features of each.

Interfaces define the contract between classes - the ways classes call each other. A class can implement multiple interfaces, but can only inherit from one abstract class.

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True that abstract classes can have default implementation which is not provided by Interfaces. So if implementation doesn't need to be included in base class, is it better to go for Interfaces?

Yes :). If it makes sense to implement some methods in the base class which will be common to all inhereted class you should use an abstract class. If the base class would only be used to define an interface but there is no common logic between the inherited classes, use an interface.

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It's rarely "either-or". Many times you'll find a healthy mix of classes with a common ancestry mixed with classes of a varied ancestry implementing the same interface. –  Adam Robinson Sep 24 '09 at 21:34
    
True, that is just the guideline that I tend to go by. If it makes sense to have some base logic for all ancestors I use an abstract class, otherwise I use an interface. –  Ed S. Sep 24 '09 at 22:15
    
ChrisF also raises a good point; you cannot inherit from more than one class, but you can inherit multiple interfaces. It is hard to define a generic rule when there are so many use cases. –  Ed S. Sep 24 '09 at 22:16
    
Thanks, you answer brought me to better understand abstract classes as I am used to use interfaces while implementing my objects. Yet remains to mention that I use interfaces to represent the data only, as if it was a data table, and code my methods behind a factory internal class, then call them throguh a façade public static class. That must be why I never had to use abstract classes. –  Will Marcouiller Sep 25 '09 at 1:10
3  
@Ed: What I was getting at is not that you have to make a choice between the two. You gain the greatest flexibility (and, accordingly, the highest maintenance cost) by having BOTH. You define the interface, then create an abstract class that provides a default implementation of the interface. This allows for the convenience of an inheritance hierarchy and the flexibility of an interface. –  Adam Robinson Sep 25 '09 at 3:33
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You can implement any number of Interfaces, but can only inherit one Class. So Classes and Interfaces are quite different beasts in C# and you cannot use them interchangeably. In C# abstract classes are still classes, not interfaces.

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For your first question, Yes.

For your second answer i'll give you some tips I've followed.

  • Use abstract classes and interfaces in combination to optimize your design trade-offs.

Use an abstract class

  • When creating a class library which will be widely distributed or reused—especially to clients, use an abstract class in preference to an interface; because, it simplifies versioning.

  • Use an abstract class to define a common base class for a family of types.

  • Use an abstract class to provide default behavior.

  • Subclass only a base class in a hierarchy to which the class logically belongs.

Use an interface

  • When creating a standalone project which can be changed at will, use an interface in preference to an abstract class; because, it offers more design flexibility.

  • Use interfaces to introduce polymorphic behavior without subclassing and to model multiple inheritance—allowing a specific type to support numerous behaviors.

  • Use an interface to design a polymorphic hierarchy for value types.

  • Use an interface when an immutable contract is really intended.

  • A well-designed interface defines a very specific range of functionality. Split up interfaces that contain unrelated functionality.

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Interfaces and abstract classes serve different goals. Interfaces are used to declare contracts for classes while abstract classes are used to share a common implementation.

If you only use abstract classes, your classes cannot inherit from other classes because C# does not support multiple inheritance. If you only use interfaces, your classes cannot share common code.

public interface IFoo
{
    void Bar();
}

public abstract class FooBase : IFoo
{
    public abstract void Bar()
    {
        // Do some stuff usually required for IFoo.
    }
}

Now we can use the interface and base implementation in various situations.

public class FooOne : FooBase
{
    public override void Bar()
    {
        base.Bar(); // Use base implementation.

        // Do specialized stuff.
    }
}

public class FooTwo : FooBase
{
    public override void Bar()
    {
        // Do other specialized stuff.

        base.Bar(); // Use base implementation.

        // Do more specialized stuff.
    }
}

// This class cannot use the base implementation from FooBase because
// of inheriting from OtherClass but it can still implement IFoo.
public class FooThree : OtherClass, IFoo
{
    public virtual void Bar()
    {
        // Do stuff.
    }
}
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If you don't have any default/common code, then go with an interface.

An abstract class can also serve as a template, where it defines the steps of some algorithm and the order in which they are called, and derived classes provide the implementation of these steps:

public abstract class Processor
{
  // this is the only public method
  // implements the order of the separate steps
  public void Process()
  {
    Step1();
    Step2();
    //... 
  }
  // implementation is provided by derived classes
  protected abstract void Step1();
  protected abstract void Step2();
}
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In C# a large deterrent for the use of abstract classes is that you can only use one. With interfaces you have the advantage of not limiting the base class for the implementation. To this end, I always use an interface even if I create an abstract base class to aid with the implementation.

Often another annoyance of base abstract classes is that they tend to rely on template arguments. This can make it very difficult for the rest of your code to utilize. The easy answer for this is to provide an interface to talk to the abstract class without knowing the type argument of the template class.

Others seem to be typing their answer faster, but allow me to summarize...

Use an interface. If you need to share implementation, you can also create an abstract base class that provides common implementation details.

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Note that with C#3, you can provide default behavior for interfaces through the use of extension methods. There are some limitations, though, and abstract classes still have their place.

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You cannot - extension methods do not implement members of interface omitted in a class implementing that interface. You can provide additional behavior to interfaces, but that one is non-polymorphic, which is kinda self-defeating in OOP. –  Pavel Minaev Sep 25 '09 at 1:51
1  
@Pavel - while it's true that extensions do not implement interface members, they can still provide valuable behavior. See the tips in Bill Wagner's book "More Effective C#" or the following article on Mixins. zorched.net/2008/01/03/… –  TrueWill Sep 25 '09 at 2:25
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The rule I follow when modeling is: Classes(abstract included) and structs model entities.Interfaces model behavior. Entities implementing an interface can be considered as exhibiting behaviors that the interface(contract) exposes.

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This is hinted at in a few of the answers but not explicitly stated.

The fact that you can implement multiple interfaces and only inherit from one base class, as if they were two sides of the same coin, isn't a good way to look at it.

Don't think of interfaces as part of an object hierarchy. They are usually just small parts of functionality (or at least specific if not small) that your real object heirarchy can declare as implementing. Take IDisposable for instance. If you were the one writing that, would you ask yourself whether it should have been an abstract class or an interface? It seems obvious that in this case they are two completely different things. I want to BE disposable. Think ICloneable and IEnumerable. You can implement those in your class without having to try and make your class derive from some unrelated classes like List or Array. Or take IEnumerator. Simply gives a MoveNext type of view to an object. My class can provide that functionality without having to awkwardly be derived from some other sequential collection data type that has nothing to do with my class.

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Whilst it's true that an abstract class with no implementation is equivalent to an interface, interfaces and abstract classes are used for different things.

Interfaces can be used for polymorphism in the most general sense. For example, ICollection is used to define the interface for all collections (there are quite a few). Here it is defining the operations that you want to perform on a certain kind of type. There are many other uses (such as testability, dependency injection etc). Also, interfaces can be mixed and this works both conceptually and technically.

Abstract classes are more to do with templateable behaviour, where virtual methods are a place to 'fill in the gaps'. Obviously you can't mix abstract classes (at least, not in C#).

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I always prefer interfaces as long as the base class don't have some really "heavy duty" implementation that will save lots of time to the implementers. giving that .net allows only one base class inheritance, forcing your users to inherit is a huge limitation.

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You should always prefer programming to interfaces than to concrete classes.

If you also want to have a default implementation you can still create a base class which implements your interface(s).

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