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I've written the following code below to find the nth prime number. Can this be improved in time complexity?

Description:

The ArrayList arr stores the computed prime numbers. Once arr reaches a size 'n', the lopp exits and we retrieve the nth element in the arraylist. Numbers 2 and 3 are added before the prime numbers are calculated, and each number starting from 4 is checked to be prime or not.

public void calcPrime(int inp) {
    ArrayList<Integer> arr = new ArrayList<Integer>(); // stores prime numbers 
                                                      // calculated so far
    // add prime numbers 2 and 3 to prime array 'arr'
    arr.add(2); 
    arr.add(3);

    // check if number is prime starting from 4
    int counter = 4;
     // check if arr's size has reached inp which is 'n', if so terminate while loop
    while(arr.size() <= inp) {
        // dont check for prime if number is divisible by 2
        if(counter % 2 != 0) {
            // check if current number 'counter' is perfectly divisible from 
           // counter/2 to 3
            int temp = counter/2;
            while(temp >=3) {
                if(counter % temp == 0)
                    break;
                temp --;
            }
            if(temp <= 3) {
                arr.add(counter);
            }
        }
        counter++;
    }

    System.out.println("finish" +arr.get(inp));
    }
}
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1  
Please give us an intuitive description of what your program does, or at least provide comments. Giving us a block of code and asking us to analyze it makes it extremely difficult for anyone to figure out what it means. –  templatetypedef Feb 7 '13 at 2:26
    
It may be open to question whether it improves the computational complexity, but a sieve of Eratosthenes is quite a bit faster anyway. –  Jerry Coffin Feb 7 '13 at 2:37
    
@templatetypedef: added comments to code. –  codewarrior Feb 7 '13 at 2:56
    
The full answer is stackoverflow.com/a/9704912/849891 . –  Will Ness Feb 7 '13 at 9:54
    
Also, it is good to search the SO first: stackoverflow.com/tags/primes/hot?filter=year . –  Will Ness Feb 7 '13 at 10:07

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Yes.

Your algorithm make O(n^2) operations (maybe I'm not accurate, but seems so), where n is result.

There are http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sieve_of_Eratosthenes algorithm that takes O(ipn* log(log(n))). You can make only inp steps in it, and assume that n = 2ipn*ln(ipn). n just should be greater then ipn-prime. (we know distributions of prime numbers http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prime_number_theorem)

Anyway, you can improve existing solution:

public void calcPrime(int inp) {
    ArrayList<Integer> arr = new ArrayList<Integer>();
    arr.add(2);
    arr.add(3);

    int counter = 4;

    while(arr.size() < inp) {
        if(counter % 2 != 0 && counter%3 != 0) {
            int temp = 4;
            while(temp*temp <= counter) {
                if(counter % temp == 0)
                    break;
                temp ++;
            }
            if(temp*temp > counter) {
                arr.add(counter);
            }
        }
        counter++;
    }

    System.out.println("finish" +arr.get(inp-1));
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
could you tell me how this works, specifically why do you check using temp*temp? thats going to check if the counter is divisible by 16,25,36.. –  codewarrior Feb 7 '13 at 3:16
1  
He checks temp*temp against counter since that implies that temp <= sqrt(counter). It's enough to check up to that point since multiplication is commutative. –  G. Bach Feb 7 '13 at 3:26
    
Brilliant. thanks! –  codewarrior Feb 7 '13 at 3:43
    
what is n? what is ipn? Is inp inp? Is this the Sieve of Eratosthenes? –  Will Ness Feb 7 '13 at 9:46
    
Don't you need to add 1 to arr? Otherwise asking for the first prime number yields 2 instead of 1. –  Keegan Aug 7 '13 at 3:17

A few things you can do to speed it up:

  1. Start counter at 5 and increment it by 2 instead of 1, then don't check mod 2 in the loop.
  2. Instead of starting temp at counter / 2, start it at the first odd <= int(sqrt(counter))
  3. decrement temp by 2.

I'm not sure whether it counts as improving complexity, but (2) above will go from O(n^2) to O(n*sqrt(n))

share|improve this answer
    
testing by temp from the sqrt down is very inefficient. I suspect it even changes the complexity for the worse. –  Will Ness Feb 7 '13 at 9:50
    
@Will It does indeed. I haven't analysed it in detail, but the semiprimes whose larger factor is at least four times the smaller factor alone give an additional log log n factor. I expect that the constant factor slowdown is much worse for a long long time, though. –  Daniel Fischer Feb 14 '13 at 23:03
    
@Daniel empirically ideone.com/iNxOrC indeed the counting-down code seems to run in m^1.5, where m is the top limit. The ratios of actual run times are 2.6x ... 3.6x and worsening, for top limit 100k ... 1.2mln. m^1.5 for counting-down code actually makes sense - there's no early cut-off so it's as if testing each odd by all odds below sqrt. While in counting-up the cost for non-prime odds is at the most the same as for primes (as shows M. O'Neill), giving the m^1.5/log(m). –  Will Ness Feb 15 '13 at 12:48
    
@Will What do you mean with "early cut-off"? You divide until you find the first divisor or hit the limit, whether you count up or down, in that respect, both ways are similar. Counting down, you generally have a much longer way to the first divisor, though. I sort-of expect it to be Θ(√n) on average (so the empirical m^1.5 fits), but I don't see an easy way to prove it (closest divisor to √n is harder to grip than smallest prime divisor). –  Daniel Fischer Feb 15 '13 at 13:35
    
@Daniel that's what I meant, yes, the much longer way is almost "all the way". It is of course not rigorous in any way. Try finding the "expected value" of biggest factor for a randomly-chosen composite in the range 2..n, something to that effect (it will be our cut-off point, on average, counting down). n or sqrt(n), I expect won't make much of a difference. –  Will Ness Feb 15 '13 at 13:59

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