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<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
<meta charset=utf-8 />
<title></title>
  <script type="text/javascript">
     function arr(){
     var a=new Array(new Array());
     var x;
     for(i=0;i<2;i++)
     {
         for(j=0;j<2;j++)
         {
             x=prompt("Enter an element for a["+i+"]["+j+"]"," ");
             a[i][j]=x;
         }
     }

     for(i=0;i<2;i++)
     {
         for(j=0;j<2;j++)
         {
            document.write(a[i][j]);
         }
     }

     document.close();

     }


     </script>

</head>

<body onLoad="arr();">

</body>
</html>

The code above was tested on Firefox. Only three prompts are displayed, instead of four:

a[0][0]
a[0][1]
a[1][0]

The array is also not printed. What's my mistake? How to fix this?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You are declaring one array less than you should. For this example, you need an array like [[],[]]. I'd code it like this (to allow for any max value of i and j):

function arr(){
     var a = [];
     var x;
     for(i=0;i<2;i++){
         a[i] = [];
         for(j=0;j<2;j++){
             x=prompt("Enter an element for a["+i+"]["+j+"]"," ");
             a[i][j]=x;
         }
     }

     for(i=0;i<2;i++){
         for(j=0;j<2;j++){
            document.write(a[i][j]);
         }
     }

}

The reason it was also not printing is that the missing array was causing an error, interrupting the execution of your function.

share|improve this answer
    
Thankyou! why new Array(new Array()) is not working?its equivalent to a[][].right? does java script support var a=[][]? –  violet kiwi Feb 7 '13 at 2:50
    
No, it's equivalent to [[]]. I guess you're coming from Java or C#? new Array(new Array()) is not an "array of arrays", it's an array object containing a single array inside. And yes, javascript supports array literals like [], and object literals like {foo : 'bar'}. It's often more practical to use them instead of the Array() and Object() constructors. –  bfavaretto Feb 7 '13 at 2:50
    
fine. iam coming from C and C++ background.i want to acheive a[2][2] in javascript.var a=[2][2] is correct? –  violet kiwi Feb 7 '13 at 2:59
    
In JavaScript you don't declare the array sizes. You either declare the whole thing as a literal (var a = [[],[]]), or create the nested arrays (a[0] and a[1]) inside the loop (like my example does for a[0]..a[i]). –  bfavaretto Feb 7 '13 at 3:03
1  
This would work too, but I don't like how it looks: var a = new Array(new Array(2), new Array(2)). If you pass an int to the Array constructor, if will initialize an array with that length, filled with undefined values. If you pass anything else (or any list of elements), you're filling the array with those elements. –  bfavaretto Feb 7 '13 at 3:06

Really sorry for the answer before, this is the correct answer

    <!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
<meta charset=utf-8 />
<title></title>
  <script type="text/javascript">
     function arr()
     {
     var a = new Array();
     var x;

 for(i=0;i<2;i++)
 {
     a[i] = new Array();
     for(j=0;j<2;j++)
     {
         x="";
         x = prompt("Enter an element for a["+i+"]["+j+"]","");
     }
 }

 for(i=0;i<2;i++)
 {
     for(j=0;j<2;j++)
     {
        document.write(a[i][j]);
     }
 }

 document.close();

 }


 </script>

the problem is you must declare new array inside the 1st array example : How can I create a two dimensional array in JavaScript?

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sorry for the answer before, here's the correct answer –  goravine Feb 7 '13 at 2:58

Your array is created like this: a[[]]

So you can only access a[0][0] and a[0][1], and a[1] returns undefined.

You can create your array like this. a = [[], []];, this will solve your problem.

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