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I am confused why Visual Studio creates/copies tons of library dlls into my project's bin/Debug folders although I have not referenced any of those libraries? The dlls represent libraries used in other projects of the same solution that above mentioned project is under but I do not get why unreferenced libraries in one given project are still copies into the bin/... folders. I use NuGet but I made sure that the solution wide NuGet manager only includes specific projects that are supplied with chosen libraries.

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if project A references project B and project B references dll C then project A most likely won't function without dll C (if any functionality from this dll is indirectly used). That's why dll C is copied to bin of project A –  zespri Feb 7 '13 at 5:06

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If project A references project B and project B references dll C then project A most likely won't function without dll C (if any functionality from this dll is indirectly used). That's why dll C is copied to the "bin" folder of project A.

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Well said Zespri. –  Brian Feb 7 '13 at 5:32
    
@zespri, one question though: You say "if any functionality from this dll is indirectly used". I guess this statement is irrelevant because even if I just reference B in A and not call code that requires referenced C in B I still end up with all the libraries that B itself references. –  Matt Wolf Feb 7 '13 at 5:41
    
Thats essentially the problem I am facing. I built a shared library that iself references other external third-party libraries. But each time I link to my built library no matter whether I use or not use any of the library content, my project immediately blows up to 100mb because of all the copied dlls. –  Matt Wolf Feb 7 '13 at 5:47
    
@Freddy .net is indeed loads dlls only when they are somehow actually used. So it IS possible that dll is referenced, but if you delete it it does not affect the application. It is most likely to occur if you are using some library for a single function, when the library require a dependency and the function in question does not. There is not much you can do here. You can either use a different (leaner) library, or use static analysis tool to confirm what's used and what's not and finally if you are 100% sure that some referenced library is not used you may include a build step to delete it. –  zespri Feb 7 '13 at 17:48
    
Thanks for following up. –  Matt Wolf Feb 7 '13 at 21:49

If you're using NuGet, are you installing the packages to every project, or selecting only the ones that use it? I'm not clear if you mean that by 'but I made sure that the solution wide NuGet manager only includes specific projects that are supplied with chosen libraries.'

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I install them only to selected projects, excluding the project in question –  Matt Wolf Feb 7 '13 at 5:38

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