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System.Data.SqlClient.SqlException (0x80131904): Violation of UNIQUE KEY constraint 'AK_SeqNo'. Cannot insert duplicate key in object 'dbo.SeqNo'.

I get the above SQL Server 2005 Express error randomly. Maybe once every 3 weeks from the stored procedure below. Can anyone see why?

CREATE PROCEDURE [dbo].[mspResetSeqNo] @Today DATETIME
AS 
BEGIN
  SET NOCOUNT ON;

  DECLARE @DateSrc DATETIME
  DECLARE @MyGUID UNIQUEIDENTIFIER

  -- Check Input is Valid
  IF @Today IS NULL 
     BEGIN
           RAISERROR (N'@Today cannot be NULL', 10, 1); 
           RETURN 1;
     END

  -- Chop off the time part:
  SET @DateSrc = DATEADD(d, 0, DATEDIFF(d, 0, @Today));

  -- Get Current Location GUID
  SET @MyGUID = dbo.MyGUID();

  -- If this is the first entry for the day then initialise
  INSERT INTO dbo.SeqNo(MyGUID, TheDay, LastNo)
  SELECT @MyGUID, @DateSrc, 0
  WHERE NOT EXISTS ( 
      SELECT 1 FROM dbo.SeqNo AS sn
      WHERE sn.MyGUID = @MyGUID AND sn.TheDay = @DateSrc 
      );

  RETURN(0);
END

The constraint for AK_SeqNo is:

ALTER TABLE [dbo].[SeqNo] ADD CONSTRAINT [AK_SeqNo] UNIQUE NONCLUSTERED 
(
[TheDay] ASC,
[MyGUID] ASC
)WITH (PAD_INDEX  = OFF, STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE  = OFF, SORT_IN_TEMPDB = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF, ONLINE = OFF, ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS  = ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS  = ON) ON [PRIMARY]

The table column for those 2 data types are:

[MyGUID] [dbo].[DForeignKey] NOT NULL,
[TheDay] [datetime] NOT NULL,

The user defined type DForeignKey is:

CREATE TYPE [dbo].[DForeignKey] FROM [uniqueidentifier] NULL

The MyGUID() function is simply retrieving the local system ID. Every location has a different ID.

CREATE FUNCTION [dbo].[MyGUID]()
RETURNS uniqueidentifier
AS
BEGIN
DECLARE @me as uniqueidentifier
SELECT @me = MyGUID FROM Self
RETURN @me
END
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How is the AK_SeqNo constraint defined? –  PinnyM Feb 7 '13 at 4:54
2  
@TildalWave For example, 2012-10-01 12:00 and 2012-10-01 14:00 are different DATETIME, but if inserted into the same DATE column, they're not unique. –  Joachim Isaksson Feb 7 '13 at 5:37
1  
@Cheval - OK, but you're creating a constraint that's defined as unique value for both TheDay and MyGUID together and that's what your UNIQUE KEY violation is telling you - you're trying to insert a new record to the table that already has this pair of values for TheDay and MyGUID in it. –  TildalWave Feb 7 '13 at 6:10
1  
@TildalWave I see what you are saying but isn't that the point of the WHERE NOT EXISTS portion of the query? If the SeqNo has already been initialised, then don't do the insert. This works perfectly for 99% of the time. –  Cheval Feb 7 '13 at 6:14
1  
@Cheval - I hear you and I'm looking into it, but I've also already asked you, if you're committing this insert in a transaction? –  TildalWave Feb 7 '13 at 6:18

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The problem was a concurrency issue. The single instance check was moved to after the point in code where this stored procedure was called. Thanks for your help. At least I learned a thing of 2 more about t-sql functions.

share|improve this answer

Is this the only way in which records get added to the table?

I'd also use CONVERT for my comparison, something like this:

  INSERT INTO dbo.SeqNo(MyGUID, TheDay, LastNo)
  SELECT @MyGUID, @DateSrc, 0
  WHERE NOT EXISTS ( 
      SELECT 1 FROM dbo.SeqNo AS sn
      WHERE sn.MyGUID = @MyGUID
      AND
      CONVERT(VARCHAR(11), sn.TheDay, 101) = CONVERT(VARCHAR(11), @Today, 101)
      );

This gets you away from having to store the intermediate value in a variable.

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