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I have a string such as this...

"test_test_test":"Hello \"Hello\" Hello","Oh_yea_oh_yea","Hi there buddy"

I want to grab

"test_test_test":"Hello \"Hello\" Hello"

So far my regex is this...

"test_test_test":

This would grab the key and colon. I will always know what "test_test_test" is, I just won't know what the value is after the colon. It would be easy if I knew there wouldn't be escaped quotations inside the quotations themselves, but there are. Thanks!

EDIT:

There can be commas inside, and there cannot be a quotation that's not escaped inside.

My idea is something along the lines of...

"test_test_test":"[^(",)]*

In my head, this says keep going until you find the single quotation followed by a comma, (",) then stop. However that doesn't work above.

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Can you have escaped backslash as well? e.g. \\ –  FoolishSeth Feb 7 '13 at 5:16
1  
No, there cannot be escaped backslashes. –  unwise guy Feb 7 '13 at 5:17
    
Can there be a comma in the quoted string? –  FoolishSeth Feb 7 '13 at 5:19
1  
yes there can be. I think the best way is what I provided above in my edit, to keep looking until there's a quotation and then a comma, because every quotation inside the value will always be escaped. –  unwise guy Feb 7 '13 at 5:20
    
No, that wouldn't work either because there can be.. \", –  unwise guy Feb 7 '13 at 5:22

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is the RAW regex. You may need to add more escape if you put into string or include a separator.

"test_test_test":"(?:[^"\\]|\\[\\"])*"

If you need flexible spacing:

"test_test_test" *: *"(?:[^"\\]|\\[\\"])*"

The key part is here: (?:[^"\\]|\\[\\"])*. It will match 0 or more of: non-quote-or-backslash, or escaped quote \" or escaped backslash \\.

The regex above is still imprecise: the content in the quoted string is allowed to span multiple lines. Whether it is good or not depends on the grammar for the quoted string. However, multi-line quoted string in the languages I have seen usually doesn't take the form described in my regex.

The regex also treats the quoted string "\n" as invalid. You can easily modify the regex a bit to accommodate those cases, though.

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hahaha!! you're awesome... would it be too difficult to explain the meaning of that? –  unwise guy Feb 7 '13 at 5:25
    
FWIW, |\\[\\"] doesn't appear to be necessary, and *: * could be shortened to .*?. –  rockerest Feb 7 '13 at 5:34
    
@rockerest: I prefer strict regex. And \\[\\"] is important to allow escaped quote and escaped \. –  nhahtdh Feb 7 '13 at 5:37
    
@unwiseguy: I was writing an explanation. And the caveats are also included. –  nhahtdh Feb 7 '13 at 5:38
    
It still matches escaped quotes and escaped \ without \\[\\"]... What engine are you using to test this expression? –  rockerest Feb 7 '13 at 5:43

If I'm understanding correctly, you want to select the key and the first entry before the comma.

Update:

You actually want the first quoted string regardless of its contents.

So your regex might look like this: /"test_test_test".*?"(?:[^"\\])*"/

Update 2:

This regex doesn't choke on escapes inside the string: "test_test_test".*?".*[^\\"].*?"(?=,)

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This is so not going to work. The regex will be greedy and eat everything up to the last , –  nhahtdh Feb 7 '13 at 5:16
    
It actually does work, I just tested it. Unless the specifications are different than I assumed, it's successful. –  rockerest Feb 7 '13 at 5:19
    
It will match up to "Oh_yea_oh_yea". Comma in the quoted string will also mess up your match. –  nhahtdh Feb 7 '13 at 5:20
    
After the question was updated to include multiple commas, I've updated the regex to stop after one. –  rockerest Feb 7 '13 at 5:22
    
Comma in quoted string will mess up your match. e.g. "test_test_test":"comma,here","more" –  nhahtdh Feb 7 '13 at 5:24

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