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If I have several binary strings with compressed zlib data, is there a way to efficiently combine them into a single compressed string without decompressing everything?

Example of what I have to do now:

c1 = zlib.compress("The quick brown fox jumped over the lazy dog. ")
c2 = zlib.compress("We ride at dawn! ")
c = zlib.compress(zlib.decompress(c1)+zlib.decompress(c2)) # Warning: Inefficient!

d1 = zlib.decompress(c1)
d2 = zlib.decompress(c2)
d = zlib.decompress(c)

assert d1+d2 == d # This will pass!

Example of what I want:

c1 = zlib.compress("The quick brown fox jumped over the lazy dog. ")
c2 = zlib.compress("We ride at dawn! ")
c = magic_zlib_add(c1+c2) # Magical method of combining compressed streams

d1 = zlib.decompress(c1)
d2 = zlib.decompress(c2)
d = zlib.decompress(c)

assert d1+d2 == d # This should pass!

I don't know too much about zlib and the DEFLATE algorithm, so this may be entirely impossible from a theoretical point of view. Also, I must use use zlib; so I can't wrap zlib and come up with my own protocol that transparently handles concatenated streams.

NOTE: I don't really mind if the solution is not trivial in Python. I'm willing to write some C code and use ctypes in Python.

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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Since you don't mind venturing into C, you can start by looking at the code for gzjoin.

Note, the gzjoin code has to decompress to find the parts that have to change when merged, but it doesn't have to recompress. That's not too bad because decompression is typically faster than compression.

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This wasn't as simple as I had hoped, but it is definitely more efficient that what I was doing before. Thanks. –  DSnet Feb 7 '13 at 7:08
    
Specifically answering the question, you cannot combine two deflate streams without decompressing the first one, as gzjoin does. Though if you are in control of creating the first deflate stream, it can be specially prepared to append to it without decompressing. –  Mark Adler Feb 7 '13 at 16:24
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In addition to gzjoin which requires decompression of the first deflate stream, you can take a look at gzlog.h and gzlog.c, which efficiently appends short strings to a gzip file without having to decompress the deflate stream each time. (It can be easily modified to operate on zlib-wrapped deflate data instead of gzip-wrapped deflate data.) You would use this approach if you are in control of the creation of the first deflate stream. If you are not creating the first deflate stream, then you would have to use the approach of gzjoin which requires decompression.

None of the approaches require recompression.

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It's good to know that the writer of zlib is answering the question. :D I will look into these. Thanks for your contribution to the free software world! –  DSnet Feb 8 '13 at 7:37
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