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I have a simple client-server application which works like this: the server is always listening (in a separate thread) for a client connection (which sends the name of process that it wants the server to kill).

Here is the server:

private void btnStart_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
  _port = int.Parse(comboBoxPorts.SelectedItem.ToString());

  _tcpListener = new TcpListener(_ipAddress, _port);

  _keepRunning = true;
  _listenerThread = new Thread(Listen);
  HandleListenerThreadStartListenEvent += HandleListenerThreadStartedEventMethod;
  ListenerThreadStartedEvent += HandleListenerThreadStartListenEvent;
  _listenerThread.Start();
}

private void btnStop_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{ 
  if (_tcpListener != null)
  {
    _keepRunning = false; 

    if (_tcpListener.Server.Connected)
    {
      _tcpListener.Server.Disconnect(true); 
    } 

    _tcpListener.Stop(); 
  }

  labelServerStatus.Text = "Server is stopped";   
  comboBoxPorts.Enabled = true; 
  btnStart.Enabled = true; 
  btnStop.Enabled = false; 
} 

private void Listen()
{
  try
  {
    _tcpListener.Start();
    OnListenerThreadStartListenEvent(); // just update the GUI
  }
  catch(Exception e)
  {
    MessageBox.Show("Port " + _port + " is NOT available." + Environment.NewLine +
                    "Please choose another one: " + e.Message);
    return;
  }

  _keepRunning = true;
  string ballonMessage = "Socket Server Running at " + _ipAddress + ", port: " + _port;
  notifyIcon1.ShowBalloonTip(2000, "Simplex Listener", ballonMessage, ToolTipIcon.Info);

  while (_keepRunning)
  {
    try
    {          
      #region using AcceptSocket()

      _clientSocket = _tcpListener.AcceptSocket();
      string checkString = string.Empty;
      IPAddress ipOfClient = ((IPEndPoint) _clientSocket.LocalEndPoint).Address;
      notifyIcon1.ShowBalloonTip(2000, "Simplex Listener", "New client has connected from ip " + ipOfClient, ToolTipIcon.Info);

      byte[] buffer = new byte[SIZE_OF_BUFFER];
      int bytesReceived = _clientSocket.Receive(buffer);

      // Concatenate chars as bytes to a received string.
      for (int i = 0; i < bytesReceived; i++)
        checkString += Convert.ToChar(buffer[i]);



      //..... getting the name of process and kill it (and than open it...
      RestartProcess(nameOfProcess, windowName, pathToExeFile);

      // Client is waiting to know operation is complete- so send him some char...
      ASCIIEncoding encoder = new ASCIIEncoding();
      _clientSocket.Send(encoder.GetBytes("v"));
      _clientSocket.Disconnect(true);
      _clientSocket.Close();
      #endregion
    }
    catch (Exception )
    {    
    }
  }
}

The client side:

public void RestartTheSoftwareInServerComputer(string ipOfServer, int portNumber)
{
  TcpClient client = new TcpClient();

  if (_serverEndPoint == null)
  {
    _serverEndPoint = new IPEndPoint(IPAddress.Parse(ipOfServer), portNumber);     
  }

  client.Connect(_serverEndPoint);

  // Send the command to the server:
  NetworkStream clientStream = client.GetStream();
  ASCIIEncoding encoder = new ASCIIEncoding();
  byte[] buffer = encoder.GetBytes("....detailsOfProcess....");

  clientStream.Write(buffer, 0, buffer.Length);
  clientStream.Flush();

  // Now, wait for the server's response [which means the process had been restart].
  NetworkStream stream = client.GetStream();
  byte[] bytes = new byte[5];
  stream.Read(bytes, 0, 5);
  string response = Encoding.UTF8.GetString(bytes, 0, 1);

  if (response.Equals("x"))
  {
    throw new Exception("Failed to restart X software.");
  }

  stream.Close();
  client.Close();
}

When I stop and restart the server (when no client had connected), then everything is OK.

The problem is when the server got some client connected, and is restarted, then the client has disconnected and the server needs to be restarted. When we hit the "START SERVER" again it will get the exception:

Only one usage of each socket address (protocol/network address/port) is normally permitted.

How should I close the port?

share|improve this question
1  
You have to terminate connection before restarting the server or else server will be stuck in time-wait state and will not be able to use the same address/port pair until timeout. This happens because you only close your application, but underlying socket still remains active in OS stack. –  KBart Feb 7 '13 at 6:36
    
I understand something is still connected but I can't understand what. In the client I disconnect the TCPCLIENT and in the server I do: '_clientSocket.Disconnect(true); _clientSocket.Close();' What do I missing? –  user1165147 Feb 7 '13 at 7:09
1  
What you forget is that you actually have 2 active sockets - one listens, another is for connected client. When you exit, only client socket is closed, and listening socket remains active. I'm not much into C#, but I believe TcpListener.Stop method is what you looking for. As stated in method description: The Stop method also closes the underlying Socket. –  KBart Feb 7 '13 at 7:17
    
please edit your question and add this code there, it is unreadable now. –  KBart Feb 7 '13 at 7:26
    
Here is something I forgot: When stopping the server here is the code: private void btnStop_Click(object sender, EventArgs e) { if (_tcpListener != null) { _keepRunning = false; if (_tcpListener.Server.Connected) { _tcpListener.Server.Disconnect(true); } _tcpListener.Stop(); } labelServerStatus.Text = "Server is stopped"; comboBoxPorts.Enabled = true; btnStart.Enabled = true; btnStop.Enabled = false; } So I do close the server socket.... –  user1165147 Feb 7 '13 at 7:30

1 Answer 1

When you exit your server, you should call _tcpListener.Stop() to close the main socket that the server is listening on.

Edit: You could also try to call _listenerThread.Join() in your stop button click, to wait for the listener thread to finish, before starting the next one.

private void btnStop_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{ 
  if (_tcpListener != null)
  {
    _keepRunning = false;

    if (_tcpListener.Server.Connected)
    {
      _tcpListener.Server.Disconnect(true); 
      _tcpListener.Stop();
      if (_clientSocket != null)
      {
        _clientSocket.Close();
        _clientSocket = null;
      }
      _listenerThread.Join();
    }
  }

  labelServerStatus.Text = "Server is stopped";   
  comboBoxPorts.Enabled = true; 
  btnStart.Enabled = true; 
  btnStop.Enabled = false; 
} 

EDIT 2:

here is a windows form that does similar to your server. I didn't need a client, just use "telnet localhost 49152" from a command prompt to 'pretend' to be the client connecting.

public partial class Form1 : Form
{
    private TcpListener _tcpListener;
    private bool _keepRunning;
    private Thread _listenerThread;
    private Socket _clientSocket;


    public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        var address = IPAddress.Parse("127.0.0.1");
        _tcpListener = new TcpListener(address, 49152);

        _keepRunning = true;
        _listenerThread = new Thread(Listen);
        _listenerThread.Start();

        button1.Enabled = false;
        button2.Enabled = true;
    }

    private void Listen()
    {
        try
        {
            _tcpListener.Start();
        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {
            MessageBox.Show(e.Message);
            return;
        }

        _keepRunning = true;

        while (_keepRunning)
        {
            try
            {
                _clientSocket = _tcpListener.AcceptSocket();

                var buffer = new byte[8192];
                var bytesReceived = _clientSocket.Receive(buffer);
                var checkString = String.Empty;

                if (_keepRunning)
                {
                    // bytesReceived can be 0 if the remote socket disconnected
                    if (bytesReceived > 0)
                    {
                        checkString = Encoding.ASCII.GetString(buffer, 0, bytesReceived);

                        // Client is waiting to know operation is complete- so send him some char...
                        var encoder = new ASCIIEncoding();
                        _clientSocket.Send(encoder.GetBytes("v"));
                    }
                    if (_clientSocket.Connected) _clientSocket.Disconnect(true);
                }
                _clientSocket.Close();
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                // really should do something with these exceptions
            }
        }
    }

    private void button2_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        if (_tcpListener != null)
        {
            _keepRunning = false;

            if (_tcpListener.Server.Connected)
            {
                _tcpListener.Server.Disconnect(true);
            }
            _tcpListener.Stop();

            if (_clientSocket != null)
            {
                _clientSocket.Close();
                _clientSocket = null;
            }
            _listenerThread.Join();
        }

        button1.Enabled = true;
        button2.Enabled = false;
    }
}

There are a lot of problems with this code, e.g. sharing variables across threads etc. but on my machine the Join doesn't seem to block for any length of time. The problem with _keepRunning is that on certain systems it's possible for one thread to not see the change from true to false, because it gets optimised or cached. You should really use some form of thread synchronisation, make it volatile, or wrap it in a lock etc. I'd suggest you have a read here about this. I'd also suggest you have a read up on Sockets too, or if as other commenters have mentioned, if you aren't interested in learning about all the idiosyncrasies of sockets and threading, perhaps you should look for a higher level library that hides it all?

share|improve this answer
    
I do use it... please see my post above.. –  user1165147 Feb 7 '13 at 7:31
    
I've edited my answer to suggest that you wait for the first listener thread to exit before starting another one, using Thread.Join. Placing it after the _tcpListener.Stop will then cause the thread to block until the current connection has completed. If you need to force the client to disconnect you'll need to stick a call to force the client to disconnect before the call to join. –  Matt Feb 7 '13 at 8:33
    
First, I've noticed that the if (_tcpListener.Server.Connected) always returns false so I wrote it like that: if (_tcpListener.Server.Connected) { _tcpListener.Server.Disconnect(true); } _tcpListener.Stop(); _listenerThread.Join(); } //... } This cause the GUI to freeze. it almost 5 minutes that it is stucked... it's like the thread can't be stoped for some reason. –  user1165147 Feb 7 '13 at 9:30
    
The reason is most likely the calls to _tcpListener.AcceptSocket() or _clientSocket.Receive(). These calls will block until something happens. Although, the _tcpListener.Stop() should cancel the AcceptSocket call. As I said in my previous comment, just before the Thread.Join you should probably check if _clientSocket is not null, and if it's connected call Disconnect(). I've updated my answer to include the change. –  Matt Feb 7 '13 at 22:16
    
I'd also suggest you check the _keepRunning flag immediately after calling _clientSocket.Receive(), and break from the while loop if it's false. Also check if receive returned 0 bytes as that is an indication that the remote socked disconnected. –  Matt Feb 8 '13 at 3:25

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