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i have a file as follows:

23  Line number 23
2   Line number 2
87  Line number 87
28  Line number 28
4   Line number 4
83  Line number 83

i need to take the first column as hash keys and second as hash value. Also i should sort the file using the hash keys

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closed as not a real question by brian d foy, Dor Cohen, Wonko the Sane, mccannf, Cyrille Feb 7 '13 at 18:56

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
what did you try? –  Krishnachandra Sharma Feb 7 '13 at 6:55
    
Please format the Question correctly, it is not clear. –  Krishnachandra Sharma Feb 7 '13 at 6:56

2 Answers 2

This is easy: We split the line at whitespace into two pieces. The first part is the $key, the rest is the $value.

We then sort the keys of the %hash alphabetically, and print out all the data.

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict; use warnings;

my %hash;
while (<>) {
  chomp; # remove newline
  my ($key, $value) = split ' ', $_, 2;
  $hash{$key} = $value;
}
# or shorter:
# my %hash = map {chomp; split ' ', $_, 2} <>;

my @sorted_keys = sort keys %hash;
for my $key (@sorted_keys) {
  print "$key $hash{$key}\n";
}
# or shorter:
# print "$_ $hash{$_}\n" for sort keys %hash;

The input can be provided via STDIN or as a file named in a command line argument.

Output for the input you provided:

2 Line number 2
23 Line number 23
28 Line number 28
4 Line number 4
83 Line number 83
87 Line number 87

If you want numerical sorting, change sort keys to sort {$a <=> $b} keys.

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Try this:

#!/usr/perl/bin  -w
use strict;
use Data::Dumper;

my $file_name = "file.txt";
open(FH, "<".$file_name) or die "Could not open $file_name";
my %hash = ();
while(<FH>) {
    chomp;
    my ($key, $value) = split(/ /, $_);
    $hash{$key} = $value;
}

close FH;

print Dumper(%hash);
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What does @garb do? What is slipt? –  amon Feb 7 '13 at 7:31

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