Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to create a function that will create dynamic levels of nesting in a python dictionary. e.g. if I call my function nesting, I want the outputs like the following:

nesting(1)  :  dict = {key1:<value>}
nesting(2)  :  dict = {key1:{key2:<value>}}
nesting(3)  :  dict = {key1:{key2:{key3:<value>}}}

and so on. I have all the keys and values before calling this function, but not before I start executing the code.

I have the keys stored in a variable 'm' where m is obtained from:

m=re.match(pattern,string)

the pattern is constructed dynamically for this case.

share|improve this question
    
What have you tried? –  Volatility Feb 7 '13 at 7:19
1  
What problem are you trying to solve? This seems a bit convoluted. –  Peter Micheal Lacey-Bordeaux Feb 7 '13 at 7:20
    
have you considered recursion? –  Greg Feb 7 '13 at 7:20
1  
@Greg, recursion in Python should be avoided if possible :) Seems like the keys (captured groups?) are stored in a plain list, so they can be traversed with a simple loop. –  nameless Feb 7 '13 at 7:38
    
I need this to implement the method as explained in : stackoverflow.com/questions/14725594/… –  Tapajit Dey Feb 7 '13 at 9:00

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can iterate over the keys like this:

def nesting(level):
    ret = 'value'
    for l in range(level, 0, -1):
        ret = {'key%d' % l: ret}
    return ret

Replace the range(...) fragment with the code which yields the keys in the desired order. So, if we assume that the keys are the captured groups, you should change the function as follows:

def nesting(match): # `match' is a match object like your `m' variable
    ret = 'value'
    for key in match.groups():
        ret = {key: ret}
    return ret

Or use reversed(match.groups()) if you want to get the keys in the opposite order.

share|improve this answer
def nesting(level, l=None):
    # assuming `m` is accessible in the function
    if l is None:
        l = level
    if level == 1:
        return {m[l-level]: 'some_value'}
    return {m[l-level]: nesting(level-1, l)

For reasonable levels, this won't exceed the recursion depth. This is also assuming that the value is always the same and that m is of the form:

['key1', 'key2', ...]

An iterative form of this function can be written as such:

def nesting(level):
    # also assuming `m` is accessible within the function
    d = 'some_value'
    l = level
    while level > 0:
        d = {m[l-level]: d}
        level -= 1
    return d

Or:

def nesting(level):
    # also assuming `m` is accessible within the function
    d = 'some_value'
    for l in range(level, 0, -1):  # or xrange in Python 2
        d = {m[l-level]: d}
    return d
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.