Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

this seems to be very stupid and primary question, but i tried to google it and search it. but cudn't find proper answer for this,

public class Person
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public int Age { get; set; }
    public Person(){}
    public Person(string name, int age)
    {
        Name = name;
        Age = age;
    }
    //Other properties, methods, events...
}

my question is if i have class like this what is the best way to create object?

Person p=new Person('abc',15)

OR

Person p=new Person();
p.Name='abc';
p.Age=15;

what is the difference between these two methods and what is the best way to create objects?

share|improve this question
1  
Just to add a third option to the mix: Person p=new Person { Name="abc", Age=15 }; - or a fourth: Person p = new Person(name: "abc", age: 15);. As X.L.Ant says: none is automatically "better" –  Marc Gravell Feb 7 '13 at 9:02

5 Answers 5

up vote 12 down vote accepted

You have to understand if you need an immutable object or not.

If you put public properties in your class, the state of every instance can be changed at every time in your code. So your class could be like this:

public class Person
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public int Age { get; set; }
    public Person(){}
    public Person(string name, int age)
    {
        Name = name;
        Age = age;
    }
    //Other properties, methods, events...
}

In this case, having a Person(string name, int age) constructor is not so useful.

The second option is to implement an immutable type. For example:

public class Person
{
    public string Name { get; private set; }
    public int Age { get; private set; }

    public Person(string name, int age)
    {
        Name = name;
        Age = age;
    }
    //Other properties, methods, events...
}

Now you have a constructor that permits to set the state for the instance, once, at creation time. Note that now setters for properties are private, so you can't change the state after your object is instantiated.

A best practice is to define classes as immutable every time is possible. To understand advantages of immutable classes I suggest you this article.

share|improve this answer
    
Your immutable class should probably have public getters and private setters. –  Servy Feb 8 '13 at 14:57
    
@Servy right! I updated my answer –  davioooh Feb 8 '13 at 15:02

There's not really a best way. Both are quite the same, unless you want to do some additional processing using the parameters passed to the constructor during initialization or if you want to ensure a coherent state just after calling the constructor. If it is the case, prefer the first one.

But for readability/maintainability reasons, avoid creating constructors with too many parameters.

In this case, both will do.

share|improve this answer
1  
Easier to test classes as well if they don't require parameters in their constructors. –  timmy Feb 7 '13 at 17:39

Really depends on your requirement, although lately I have seen a trend for classes with at least one bare constructor defined.

The upside of posting your parameters in via constructor is that you know those values can be relied on after instantiation. The downside is that you'll need to put more work in with any library that expects to be able to create objects with a bare constructor.

My personal preference is to go with a bare constructor and set any properties as part of the declaration.

Person p=new Person()
{
   Name = "Han Solo",
   Age = 39
};

This gets around the "class lacks bare constructor" problem, plus reduces maintenance ( I can set more things without changing the constructor ).

share|improve this answer

If you think less code means more efficient, so using construct function is better. You also can use code like:

Person p=new Person(){
Name='abc',
Age=15
}
share|improve this answer

In my humble opinion, this is just a matter of deciding if the arguments are optional or not. If an Person object shouldn't (logically) exist without Name and Age, they should be mandatory in the constructor. If they are optional, (i.e. their absence is not a threat to the good functioning of the object), use the setters.

Here's a quote from Symfony's docs on constructor injection:

There are several advantages to using constructor injection:

  • If the dependency is a requirement and the class cannot work without it then injecting it via the constructor ensures it is present when the class is used as the class cannot be constructed without it.
  • The constructor is only ever called once when the object is created, so you can be sure that the dependency will not change during the object's lifetime.

These advantages do mean that constructor injection is not suitable for working with optional dependencies. It is also more difficult to use in combination with class hierarchies: if a class uses constructor injection then extending it and overriding the constructor becomes problematic.

(Symfony is one of the most popular and respected php frameworks)

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.