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This line causes error "The constructor Vector(double[], double[]) is undefined":

Vector<trainingSet> set = new Vector<trainingSet>({1.0, 1.0}, {0.0, 0.0});

While the class "trainingSet" has indeed a corresponding constructor:

public class trainingSet {
    public double [] pattern, result;
    public trainingSet(){}
    public trainingSet(double[] Pattern, double[] Result){
        pattern = Pattern;
        result = Result;
    }
}

Any idea?

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3  
FWIW, the overwhelming convention in Java code is to use initial capitals on class and interface names (so, TrainingSet, not trainingSet). You can flout that convention if you like, but it will result in people having trouble reading your code. –  T.J. Crowder Feb 7 '13 at 9:04
1  
@crazyfffan It will pay if you learn to read error messages. The message says: "The constructor Vector bla bla bla is undefined." It doesn't help that there is some constructor in some unrelated class. It is as if you want to have scrambled eggs, and the cook tells you: "Sorry, I am out of eggs." to which you respond "But John has got wine!" –  Ingo Feb 7 '13 at 9:09
    
@Ingo The error reads "The constructor Vector<HelloWorld.trainingSet> blah blah" so it's not so obvious as you said. Anyway thanks for the cooking lecture. It really does make you sound precocious. –  Fukuzawa Yukio Feb 7 '13 at 9:11
    
@crazyfffan Thats's why I say you need to learn to read them right (by skipping unimportant stuff). Your class name is just a type parameter, like the scrambled in scrambled eggs. If you have no eggs, it doesn't matter if you can't make scrambled or cooked eggs. –  Ingo Feb 7 '13 at 9:15

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You are calling constructor of Vector class which is not exist, try this,

    double[] Pattern={1.0, 1.0};
    double[] Result={0.0, 0.0};

    Vector<trainingSet> set = new Vector<trainingSet>();
    set.add(new trainingSet(Pattern, Result));
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Because you are not initializing trainingSet but the Vector class itself. Vector has only default constructor, constructor with initial size and you can also pass other collections to it. You should do something like

Vector<trainingSet> vector = new Vector<trainingSet>();
double[] result = {1.0, 1.0};
double[] pattern = {0.0, 0.0};
vector.add(new trainingSet(result, pattern));

Also consider using List instead of Vector unless you don't need synchronization. Vector is much more slower collection then a List.

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This line: vector.add(new trainingSet({1.0, 1.0}, {0.0, 0.0})); still causes an error: "The constructor HelloWorld.trainingSet(double, double, double) is undefined". That's really insane because there're obviously only 2 double[]s. –  Fukuzawa Yukio Feb 7 '13 at 9:18
    
I see it has been already solved in previous answers, I will update mine too. –  Petr Mensik Feb 7 '13 at 9:30

Java's Vector has no constuctor taking a single element of the collection type. Also you are trying to construct the vector by passing two Arrays with doubles, not a trainingSet. Possible fix would be:

Vector<trainingSet> set = new Vector<trainingSet>();
set.add(new trainingSet(new double[]{1.0, 1.0}, new double{0.0, 0.0}));
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It won't work, somehow I can't fetch any double[] directly to the constructor. So this works: trainingSet s2 = new trainingSet(new double[] {1.0}, new double[]{1.1}); And this doesn't: trainingSet s2 = new trainingSet({1.0}, {1.1}); –  Fukuzawa Yukio Feb 7 '13 at 9:28
    
@crazyfffan true. I did not notice that, sorry. I don't think you can construct double array like that. –  Ivaylo Strandjev Feb 7 '13 at 9:29

You are passing parameter to vector constructor and not in the cunstructor of class named trainingSet

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because of your definition Vector<trainingSet>

Vector expects trainingSet type only and not double premitive

you can change it to

Vector<trainingSet> set = 

new Vector<trainingSet>().add(new trainingSet({1.0, 1.0},{0.0,0.0})));
share|improve this answer
    
does Vector have such constructor? I did not find it in the documentation. –  Ivaylo Strandjev Feb 7 '13 at 9:06

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