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i need to run the following code for only 60 seconds

the code works prefect with delay for 2 sec and repeat every 5 seconds..

but here i need to do this all for 60 seconds only

        int delay = 3000; // delay for 3 sec. 
        int period = 5000; // repeat every 5 sec. 
        Timer timer = new Timer();
        timer.scheduleAtFixedRate(new TimerTask() {

            public void run() {
                System.out.println("Would it run?"+System.currentTimeMillis());
            }
        }, delay, period);

Please let me know how to do this?

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so the thread should sleep after 60 seconds or it should be dead ?? in either case , just create a check for 60 secs and kill it –  Hussain Akhtar Wahid 'Ghouri' Feb 7 '13 at 9:12
    
it should kill.... –  Sathish Feb 7 '13 at 9:16
    
i mean if you ned the thread to run every hour or so , then make it sleep , or if you need it just once , just kill it after 60 secs –  Hussain Akhtar Wahid 'Ghouri' Feb 7 '13 at 9:27

6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You can do it simply with a ScheduledExecutorService:

  • Schedule the task
  • retrieve the ScheduledFuture
  • cancel that future after 60 seconds:
final ScheduledExecutorService scheduler = Executors.newScheduledThreadPool(1);

final Runnable task = new Runnable() {
    public void run() {
        System.out.println("Would it run?"+System.currentTimeMillis());
    }
};
final ScheduledFuture<?> handle =
        scheduler.scheduleAtFixedRate(task, 2, 5, TimeUnit.SECONDS);
scheduler.schedule(new Runnable() {
    public void run() { handle.cancel(true); }
}, 60, SECONDS);
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+1 And never look back to Timer :) –  Marko Topolnik Feb 7 '13 at 9:22
    
@assylias the code is still loading how to stop the code? –  Sathish Feb 7 '13 at 9:27
    
@Sathish What do you mean the code is still loading? –  assylias Feb 7 '13 at 9:37
    
@assylias i need to kill how to do that –  Sathish Feb 7 '13 at 9:39
    
You need to make sure your task responds to interruptions. –  assylias Feb 7 '13 at 9:45
public class test{
static int delay = 3000; // delay for 3 sec. 
       static int period = 5000; // repeat every 5 sec. 
        static int totaltime = 0;   
public static void main(String ar[]){


        Timer timer = new Timer();
        timer.scheduleAtFixedRate(new TimerTask() {

            public void run() {
                test.totaltime+= ((test.delay+test.period)/1000);

                if(test.totaltime > 60)System.exit(0);
                System.out.println("Would it run?"+System.currentTimeMillis());

            }
        }, test.delay, test.period);
}
    }
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I don't think this will work... I think the OP wants that Task to run for 60 seconds and then stop... Your code will start after a 60 seconds delay... –  Radu Murzea Feb 7 '13 at 9:12
    
this works, tested –  TheWhiteRabbit Feb 7 '13 at 9:25
    
Yep, I agree, this version is much better. +1 :) . –  Radu Murzea Feb 7 '13 at 9:30
    
@TechExchange this code is not working exactly 60 seconds –  Sathish Feb 8 '13 at 5:06
    
then you have to calculate the time requiered for other statements and subtract it, i dont think its feasible –  TheWhiteRabbit Feb 8 '13 at 5:10

You need to count how many times you've bee doing that, and then cancel:

import java.util.Timer;
import java.util.TimerTask;


public class Waiting {
    public static int times;

    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        int delay = 3000;  // delay for 3 sec. 
        int period = 5000; // repeat every 5 sec. 
        times = 60000 / ( delay + period );


        Timer timer = new Timer();
        timer.scheduleAtFixedRate( new TimerTask() {

            public void run() {
                System.out.println( "Times remaining: " + Waiting.times );

                --Waiting.times;
                if ( Waiting.times == 0 ) {
                    this.cancel();
                    System.exit( 0 );
                }
            }
        }, delay, period); 
    }
}

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
Will times not need to be public static. I'm rusty in java but I don't think that that will be in scop.e –  Andrew Feb 7 '13 at 9:18
    
inside run() to use times variable means then final int times = 60000 so --times cannot assign final value –  Sathish Feb 7 '13 at 9:19
    
Yep. I was just being schematic. –  Baltasarq Feb 7 '13 at 9:20
    
@Baltasarq here how you decreament the times variable –  Sathish Feb 7 '13 at 9:30
    
Complete code example added. –  Baltasarq Feb 7 '13 at 14:29

You can set up a timer that will go to 60 and set up an if something like this:

int time = 3;

 timer.scheduleAtFixedRate(new TimerTask() {

            public void run() {
     if(time<60){
                System.out.println("Would it run?"+System.currentTimeMillis());
                time = time + 5;
     }
     else{ timer.stop(); }
            }
        }, delay, period);
share|improve this answer
    
variable time is not accessible inside innerclass –  TheWhiteRabbit Feb 7 '13 at 9:26

Just call cancel from the run method after the desired number of repetitions.

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to be honest i never used timer, but if you want to run your task for some period of time, why dont usepublic void schedule(TimerTask task,long delay, long period)

if i undarstand correctly, you want to run your task now, for 60secs, so:

timer.schedule(myTask,0,60000);

should do for you, but as i said, i never work with timers, so i'm not 100% sure will it work

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