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I'm trying to port a C# implementation of MurmurHash3 to VB.Net.

It runs... but can someone provide me with some known Test Vectors to verify correctness?

  • Known string text
  • Seed value
  • Result of MurmurHash3

Thanks in advance.

Edit : I'm limiting the implementation to only the 32-bit MurmurHash3, but if you can also provide vectors for the 64-bit implementation, would also be good.

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1 Answer 1

SMHasher uses a little routine to check that the hashes are working, basically it calculates the hashes for the following values, using a decreasing seed value (from 256) for each:

' The comment in the SMHasher code is a little wrong -
' it's missing the first case.
{}, {0}, {0, 1}, {0, 1, 2} ... {0, 1, 2, ... 254}

And appends that to a HASHLENGTH * 256 length array, in other words:

' Where & is a byte array concatenation.
HashOf({}, 256) &
HashOf({0}, 255) &
HashOf({0, 1}, 254) &
...
HashOf({0, 1, ... 254), 1)

It then takes the hash of that big array. The first 4 bytes of the final hash are interpreted as a unsigned 32bit integer and checked against a verification code:

  • MurmurHash3 x86 32 0xB0F57EE3
  • MurmurHash3 x86 128 0xB3ECE62A
  • MurmurHash3 x64 128 0x6384BA69

Unfortunately that's the only public test I could find. I guess the other option would be to write a quick C app and hash some values.

Here is my C# implementation of the verifier.

static void VerificationTest(uint expected)
{
    using (var hash = new Murmur3())
    // Also test that Merkle incremental hashing works.
    using (var cs = new CryptoStream(Stream.Null, hash, CryptoStreamMode.Write))
    {
        var key = new byte[256];

        for (var i = 0; i < 256; i++)
        {
            key[i] = (byte)i;
            using (var m = new Murmur3(256 - i))
            {
                var computed = m.ComputeHash(key, 0, i);
                // Also check that your implementation deals with incomplete
                // blocks.
                cs.Write(computed, 0, 5);
                cs.Write(computed, 5, computed.Length - 5);
            }
        }

        cs.FlushFinalBlock();
        var final = hash.Hash;
        var verification = ((uint)final[0]) | ((uint)final[1] << 8) | ((uint)final[2] << 16) | ((uint)final[3] << 24);
        if (verification == expected)
            Console.WriteLine("Verification passed.");
        else
            Console.WriteLine("Verification failed, got {0:x8}, expected {1:x8}", verification, expected);
    }
}
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