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In some themes in sublime text, the background colour of the area within certain tags like script or php is of a different colour from the rest of the code. For example like that in the iPlastic or twilight theme.

For Example: http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/541/screenshot20130207at342.png/

I hope to achieve the same effect in the Tomorrow colour scheme which does not have this by default. I understand that i have to edit the .tmTheme file, but I am not sure of the code I am supposed to put in.

Any help would be much appreciated.

Thanks!

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2  
That image doesn't work anymore... –  Camil Staps Jun 15 '13 at 14:24

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You should add something like this to your .tmTheme file:

<dict>
    <key>name</key>
    <string>Embedded source</string>
    <key>scope</key>
    <string>text source</string>
    <key>settings</key>
    <dict>
        <key>background</key>
        <string>#FCFCFC</string>
    </dict>
</dict>

Of course you can set the colors that you prefer.

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Hi Riccardo..thats exactly what i was looking for..thanks a bunch! –  indrago Feb 7 '13 at 12:25
    
Just to be clear, Sublime's .tmTheme files can be found in your Application Data folder. In Windows 7 an example would be C:\Documents and Settings\Gupta\Application Data\Sublime Text 2\Packages\Color Scheme - Default\Eiffel.tmTheme –  Iain S Jun 17 '13 at 12:56

Open with Sublime the .tmTheme file you want to edit, and first of all save it with a different name (but with the same extension). Then look for this:

<string>text source</string>

This is present only in some of the .tmTheme files! In the file iPlastic.tmTheme file you mentioned, you will find it in this entry:

    <dict>
        <key>name</key>
        <string>Embedded source</string>
        <key>scope</key>
        <string>text source</string>
        <key>settings</key>
        <dict>
            <key>background</key>
            <string>#FAFAFAFC</string>
            <key>foreground</key>
            <string>#000000</string>
        </dict>
    </dict>

If .tmTheme files were written in JSON instead of this clumsy XML, the entry would look like this:

{
    "name": "Embedded source",
    "scope": "text source",
    "settings": {
        "background": "#FAFAFAFC",
        "foreground": "#000000"
    }
},

In this case the background value is almost white (0xFA in all three channels), but a tiny bit transparent (0xFC opacity). The result depends on the background value you find towards the start of the file, which in this case is #EEEEEEEB (notice the absence of name and scope):

    <dict>
        <key>settings</key>
        <dict>
            <key>background</key>
            <string>#EEEEEEEB</string>

The 0xEB opacity, as far as I can tell, is ignored here, since the default background is #EE. #FA with 0xFC opacity gets composited over #EE as #F9 (which makes sense).

Now, if you want to force the background of the text source scope to some value, you have to change its <dict> entry if it's present, and add it if it's not.

If, on the other hand, you want to make the background of the text source scope equal to all the rest, what you have to do is simply to delete its <dict> entry.

Remember that a 3-byte value like #AABBCC is 100% opaque, i.e., it has 0xFF opacity, i.e., it is equivalent to the 4-byte value #AABBCCFF.

Keep also in mind that you may put the modified .tmTheme file underneath, e.g., the PHP subdirectory of Packages, instead of the Color Scheme - Default subdirectory. This is particularly useful for PHP, where the default background is the one outside of <?php...?>, while the one inside is the one of the text source scope (this is an artifact of the trick used in order to inherit the settings for the HTML file type). Unless your PHP files contain lots of HTML (or whatever you have outside <?php...?>), you might want to put underneath PHP a theme with a background value for text source equal to the default background value for other file types, and a different default background value just for PHP files.

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