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In my Visual Studio 2012 solution I have a C# project for unit testing C++/CLI code, e.g.

...
using System.IO;
using Stuff;

namespace MyCLIClassTest
{
    [TestClass]
    public class MyCLIClassTest
    {
        public MyCLIClassTest() {}

        [ClassInitialize]
        public static void Setup(TestContext testContext) 
        {
        }

        [TestMethod]
        public void LibraryAccessTest()
        {
            ...
        }
    }
}

Now, the C# tests all fail with a message like "Method MyCLIClassTest.MyCLIClassTest.ClassInitialize has wrong signature. The method must be static, public, does not return a value and should take a single parameter of type TestContext."

After removing the ClassInitializer I got "Unable to set TestContext property for the class MyCLIClassTest.MyCLIClassTest. Error: System.ArgumentException: Object of type 'Microsoft.VisualStudio.TestPlatform.MSTestFramework.TestContextImplementation' cannot be converted to type 'Microsoft.VisualStudio.TestTools.UnitTesting.TestContext'..

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Everything seems good to me. What happens when you exclude C++ tests? Can you exclude them from project for a while and see what happens with C#? –  nikita Feb 7 '13 at 11:11
    
@nikita: Same error message. Maybe it has nothing to do with the c++ tests at all? So, then it is a certain setting of the c# project? Or a general option? –  TobiMcNamobi Feb 7 '13 at 11:46
1  
Still don't see anything suspicious here. Comment [ClassInitialize] method. Two [ClassInitialize] methods? –  nikita Feb 7 '13 at 12:02
    
OK, got it. After removing the ClassInitializer I got this: "Unable to set TestContext property for the class MyCLIClassTest.MyCLIClassTest. Error: System.ArgumentException: Object of type 'Microsoft.VisualStudio.TestPlatform.MSTestFramework.TestContextImplementation' cannot be converted to type 'Microsoft.VisualStudio.TestTools.UnitTesting.TestContext'..". And this had to do with the References. I still used the DLL of an older framework version. –  TobiMcNamobi Feb 7 '13 at 12:21
    

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I used DLLs of older unit testing framework versions. This happened because the project migrated recently to VS2012.

So, in the solution explorer under the test project you find "References". Right click it and select "Add reference..." to open the Reference Manager. Search for "unittest" and check the Microsoft.VisualStudio.QualityTools.UnitTestFramework with version number 10.1.0.0. Un-check all other versions of this assembly. Close the manager by clicking OK.

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I had the exact same issue and removing/adding references as suggested by TobiMcNamobi did not solve it for me, however removing the reference, right click the project and selecting "Add > Unit test..." and thereby getting the reference re-generated worked. Not sure what the difference was compared to doing it manually.

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An alternate answer copied from a duplicate question: Why is a ClassInitialize decorated method making all my tests fail?

The [ClassInitialize] decorated method should be static and take exactly one parameter of type TestContext:

[ClassInitialize]
public static void SetupAuth(TestContext context)
{
    var x = 0;
}
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As you can see in the question above the ClassInitialize decorated method is already public static void, unique in the test class, and takes a single TestContext parameter. Those two questions have two different answers. Thanks for the reference though. –  TobiMcNamobi Mar 19 at 8:08
    
I missed the TestContext parameter, so thanks for the help! –  James Ekema May 27 at 18:18

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