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I'm sorry if this is a trivial question. My fortran-fu is poor.

Is there a way in fortran to path the array length? Using common (which, from what I gather is equivalent to global) is an option as well. What I want is in the main program to call to a function with an array. For example (This is typed in, not copy paste from anywhere)

program prog
integer num
double precision x(num),v
double precision test

....
v=test(x,num)
....


function test(x,num)
double precision test
integer num
double precision x(num)
test=0.0d0
....
return
end

This won't compile since num is not a constant. The important thing is to know what it the array size I'm passing.

Edit: I'm using f95 compiler.

Edit2: I tried High Performance Mark's solution without luck:

  program prog
  integer v
  parameter (v=10)
  double precision x(v),test,k
  k=test(x)
  write (*,*) size(x)
  stop
  end

  function test(x)
  double precision, dimension(:),intent(in) :: x
  double precision test
  write (*,*) size(x)
  test = 0.0d0
  return
  end

The output should be two lines where 10 and 10 are written. Instead I got this:

/scpc:niels: #$ f95 err.f
/scpc:niels: #$ ./a.out 
           0
          10
/scpc:niels: #$ 
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Another style comments beside the common blocks. There is no reason to use 'stop' or 'return' before the 'end'. double precision should avoided and changed to real(rp), where rp might be rp=kind(1d.0) for simplicity or you use selected_real_kind.Also, indent tour code! –  Vladimir F Feb 7 '13 at 12:45
    
@VladimirF Thank you for you comments. I use the same indention that Emacs use. As four your other comments, I'm updating my adivsor code and my fortran-fu is low. I suspect that I'll do more damage then good if I'll try and do that. –  Yotam Feb 7 '13 at 13:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Fortran arrays 'know' how long they are, you shouldn't need to pass the array and its length as different arguments. (Unless, that is, you are interfacing with old Fortran codes.) Today you'd write something like this

function test(arr)
    real, dimension(:), intent(in) :: arr
    ...
    integer :: arrsize
    ...
    arrsize = size(arr)
    ...

If you have to interface to old code in which array sizes are passed you can make calls like this

  call old_fortran_subr(array, size(array, 1), other_arguments)

Oh, and while I'm writing, have nothing to do with common in any code you write from scratch, it's a (rightly) deprecated feature from the 70's and earlier. Instead use module variables.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Just for the last sentence. Common blocks should be avoided like the plague in any even vaguely modern dialect of Fortran. –  talonmies Feb 7 '13 at 12:10
    
I tried this without luck. I have edited my question with what I did. Where can I read about module variables? –  Yotam Feb 7 '13 at 12:16
    
My compiler (Intel Fortran 13.0) compiles your new code and writes 10 out twice. Either what you have posted isn't a faithful copy of your code or you have problems I cannot see. –  High Performance Mark Feb 7 '13 at 12:24
3  
@Yotam: you have an assumed-shape array (dimension(:)) dummy argument in your function, which requires an "explicit interface". The easiest way to provide this is to make your function an internal procedure of the program, or of a module that you use in the program. –  sigma Feb 7 '13 at 12:46
1  
On the subject of module variables, while they are less bad than common still avoid them wherever possible. Global variables make code maintenance and development harder, it really is good practice to keep the scope of variables as small as possible, and it will save you time and energy in the long run. –  Ian Bush Feb 7 '13 at 13:52

OK, there's a lot going on here, especially as the Fortran style you are using is a little archaic. Let's do it by steps ...

Firstly make sure you always use implicit none

Secondly if you know the size of the array a priori you can use a symbolic constant to denote its size. You do this via a parameter:

Program prog

  Implicit None ! ALWAYS USE THIS

  Integer, Parameter :: num = 36

  Double Precision x( num )
  Double Precision test
  Double Precision v

  Call Random_number( x )

  v = test( x, num )

  Write( *, * ) v

End Program prog

Function test( x, num )

  Implicit None ! ALWAYS USE THIS

  Double Precision test

  Integer num
  Double Precision x( num )

  Integer i

  test = 0.0d0
  Do i = 1, num
     test = test + x( i ) * x( i )
  End Do

End Function test
[luser@cromer stackoverflow]$ gfortran -O -std=f95 -Wall -Wextra -pedantic func.f90
[luser@cromer stackoverflow]$ ./a.out
   12.129812171430215     

Note how num is set to be 36, but the parameter bit means I can not change its value - it is a constant and so can be used to set the size of arrays.

And that is how things stood until 1990. Then a number of things came into the language which change the answer. Most directly connected to your question are allocatable arrays, which allow you to specify the size of the array at run time, and assumed shape arrays, which make passing arrays to subprograms simpler. However a whole slew of other things came in and I suggest you have a look in a book to learn about them - the new language is much more expressive and safer than the old. As an example I would write the above nowadays as something like

[luser@cromer stackoverflow]$ cat func.f90

Module numbers_module

  Integer, Parameter :: wp = Selected_real_kind( 12, 70 )

End Module numbers_module

    Module funcs_module

      Use numbers_module

      Implicit None

      Public :: test

      Private

    Contains

      Function test( x ) Result( sum_sq )

        Implicit None ! ALWAYS USE THIS

        Real( wp ) :: sum_sq

        Real( wp ), Dimension( : ), Intent( In ) :: x

        sum_sq = Sum( x * x )

      End Function test

    End Module funcs_module

    Program prog

      Use numbers_module
      Use funcs_module

      Implicit None ! ALWAYS USE THIS

      Real( wp ), Dimension( : ), Allocatable :: x 

      Real( wp ) :: v

      Integer :: num

      Write( *, * ) 'How many elements ?'
      Read ( *, * ) num
      Allocate( x( 1:num ) )

      Call Random_number( x )

      v = test( x )

      Write( *, * ) v

    End Program prog

    [luser@cromer stackoverflow]$ gfortran -O -std=f95 -Wall -Wextra -pedantic func.f90
    [luser@cromer stackoverflow]$ ./a.out
     How many elements ?
    39
       14.151818513394156  

If you decide to go this way make sure you understand why to use this method an interface to test needs to be in scope at the calling point - and to do this read a book.

Oh. Common. Just Say No.

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