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I have a structure similar to this:

Company
(
  CompanyID
  CompanyLastTransactionNo
)

Transaction
(
  TransactionID
  CompanyID
  CompanyTransactionNo
  TransactionAmount
)

So then I have a procedure that does something like:

INSERT INTO Transaction
(CompanyID, CompanyTransactionNo, TransactionAmount)
SELECT 
   CompanyID,
   fn_GetNextCompanyTrancationNo(CompanyID),
   TransactionAmount
FROM
   LoadingTable


CREATE FUNCTION [dbo].[fn_GetNextCompanyTrancationNo]
(
 @CompanyID CHAR(10)
)
RETURNS INT
AS
BEGIN
    DECLARE @trxno int
           DECLARE @trxnoNew int

    SELECT @trxno = CompanyLastTransactionNo
    FROM dbo.Company
    WHERE ID = @CompanyID;

    SET @trxnoNew = @trxno + 1;

    UPDATE dbo.Company
    SET CompanyLastTransactionNo = @trxnoNew
    WHERE CompanyID = @CompanyID;


    RETURN @trxno

END

When compiling I get:

Msg 443, Level 16, State 15, Procedure fns_fn_GetNextCompanyTrancationNo, Line 19 Invalid use of a side-effecting operator 'UPDATE' within a function.

DUH. Totally forgot about that.

So here is my question, is there a way to use a Stored Proc as an inline function, similiar to this? Maybe this is a bad approach all together?

I'm kind of stuck with the tables I have, or I would be using a sequence to get the next number?

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1  
You mention sequences: are you using SQL Server 2012? –  Matt Feb 7 '13 at 12:41
    
Nope, Using 2008 R2. Yea, I know Sequence isn't available until 2012. But I should have clairified. It's 2008R2. –  Drew Jenkel Feb 7 '13 at 13:07
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1 Answer

This is a bad idea. The problem with UDF's that have side effects is that you have no control over when/how it is called in the context of a select statement.

Consider the following:

CREATE TABLE t (id INT )
INSERT INTO t (id) values (1)
INSERT INTO t (id) values (2)
INSERT INTO t (id) values (3)
INSERT INTO t (id) values (4)
INSERT INTO t (id) values (5)
INSERT INTO t (id) values (6)
INSERT INTO t (id) values (7)
INSERT INTO t (id) values (8)
INSERT INTO t (id) values (9)
INSERT INTO t (id) values (10)

SELECT id, dbo.myUDF() FROM t WHERE t.id <= 3 and dbo.myUDF() = @someValue

How many times does myUDF() get called? 10? 3? 13? or 20?

Specifically, there is nothing in the SQL language standard that dictates the order in which the predicates be applied.

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