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How do you calculate the least common multiple of multiple numbers?

So far I've only been able to calculate it between two numbers. But have no idea how to expand it to calculate 3 or more numbers.

So far this is how I did it

LCM = num1 * num2 /  gcd ( num1 , num2 )

With gcd is the function to calculate the greatest common divisor for the numbers. Using euclidean algorithm

But I can't figure out how to calculate it for 3 or more numbers.

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Shouldn't that be "3 or more numbers"? –  Chris Charabaruk Sep 29 '08 at 4:45
    
oops.. thanks.. edited the post –  paan Sep 29 '08 at 4:51
24  
please don't tag this as homework. I'm trying to find a way to fit multiple pieces of metal sheets onto a plate and need to find a way to fit different length metal on the same plate. LCM and GCD is the best way to do this. I'ma programmer not a math guy. THat's why I asked. –  paan Sep 29 '08 at 8:45
    
Fitting small sheets into a larger sheet -- 2D bin packing ? –  High Performance Mark Jan 28 '10 at 10:17
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10 Answers

up vote 51 down vote accepted

You can compute the LCM of more than two numbers by iteratively computing the LCM of two numbers, i.e.

lcm(a,b,c) = lcm(a,lcm(b,c))
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thanks. That done it for me –  paan Sep 29 '08 at 4:53
3  
Ooooh textbook recursion :) –  Peter Wone Sep 30 '08 at 13:24
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In Python (modified primes.py):

def gcd(a, b):
    """Return greatest common divisor using Euclid's Algorithm."""
    while b:      
        a, b = b, a % b
    return a

def lcm(a, b):
    """Return lowest common multiple."""
    return a * b // gcd(a, b)

def lcmm(*args):
    """Return lcm of args."""   
    return reduce(lcm, args)

Usage:

>>> lcmm(100, 23, 98)
112700
>>> lcmm(*range(1, 20))
232792560

reduce() works something like that:

>>> f = lambda a,b: "f(%s,%s)" % (a,b)
>>> print reduce(f, "abcd")
f(f(f(a,b),c),d)
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I'm not familiar with python, what does reduce() do? –  paan Sep 29 '08 at 4:49
9  
Given a function f and a list l = [a,b,c,d], reduce(f,l) returns f(f(f(a,b),c),d). It's the functional implementation of "lcm can be computed by iteratively computing the lcm of the current value and the next element of the list." –  A. Rex Sep 29 '08 at 4:53
3  
+1 for showing a solution that can adapt to more than three parameters –  OnesimusUnbound Aug 4 '11 at 14:26
    
can you make the lcm function behave like the lcmm function by reducing itself? My first thought is to make it do the lcm() when there are 2 arguments, and do the reduce() when there are more. –  endolith Jun 14 '12 at 2:34
    
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Here's an ECMA-style implementation:

function gcd(a, b){
    // Euclidean algorithm
    var t;
    while (b != 0){
        t = b;
        b = a % b;
        a = t;
    }
    return a;
}

function lcm(a, b){
    return (a * b / gcd(a, b));
}

function lcmm(args){
    // Recursively iterate through pairs of arguments
    // i.e. lcm(args[0], lcm(args[1], lcm(args[2], args[3])))

    if(args.length == 2){
        return lcm(args[0], args[1]);
    } else {
        var arg0 = args[0];
        args.shift();
        return lcm(arg0, lcmm(args));
    }
}
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1  
It feels bad that I don't understand what you mean by "ECMA-style" =/ –  freitass Jan 10 '12 at 12:48
1  
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I just figured this out in Haskell:

lcm' :: Integral a => a -> a -> a
lcm' a b = a`div`(gcd a b) * b
lcm :: Integral a => [a] -> a
lcm (n:ns) = foldr lcm' n ns

I even took the time to write my own gcd function, only to find it in Prelude! Lots of learning for me today :D

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You can use foldr1 for the last line: lcm ns = foldr1 lcm' ns or lcm = foldr1 lcm' –  Neil Mayhew Feb 28 '13 at 5:20
    
You can also dispense with the type signatures, for a really minimal result, as Integral is implied by div –  Neil Mayhew Feb 28 '13 at 5:24
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Some Python code that doesn't require a function for gcd:

from sys import argv 

def lcm(x,y):
    tmp=x
    while (tmp%y)!=0:
        tmp+=x
    return tmp

def lcmm(*args):
    return reduce(lcm,args)

args=map(int,argv[1:])
print lcmm(*args)

Here's what it looks like in the terminal:

$ python lcm.py 10 15 17
510
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you can do it another way - Let there be n numbers.Take a pair of consecutive numbers and save its lcm in another array. Doing this at first iteration program does n/2 iterations.Then next pick up pair starting from 0 like (0,1) , (2,3) and so on.Compute their LCM and store in another array. Do this until you are left with one array. (it is not possible to find lcm if n is odd)

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Here is a C# port of Virgil Disgr4ce's implemenation:

public class MathUtils
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Calculates the least common multiple of 2+ numbers.
    /// </summary>
    /// <remarks>
    /// Uses recursion based on lcm(a,b,c) = lcm(a,lcm(b,c)).
    /// Ported from http://stackoverflow.com/a/2641293/420175.
    /// </remarks>
    public static Int64 LCM(IList<Int64> numbers)
    {
        if (numbers.Count < 2)
            throw new ArgumentException("you must pass two or more numbers");
        return LCM(numbers, 0);
    }

    public static Int64 LCM(params Int64[] numbers)
    {
        return LCM((IList<Int64>)numbers);
    }

    private static Int64 LCM(IList<Int64> numbers, int i)
    {
        // Recursively iterate through pairs of arguments
        // i.e. lcm(args[0], lcm(args[1], lcm(args[2], args[3])))

        if (i + 2 == numbers.Count)
        {
            return LCM(numbers[i], numbers[i+1]);
        }
        else
        {
            return LCM(numbers[i], LCM(numbers, i+1));
        }
    }

    public static Int64 LCM(Int64 a, Int64 b)
    {
        return (a * b / GCD(a, b));
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Finds the greatest common denominator for 2 numbers.
    /// </summary>
    /// <remarks>
    /// Also from http://stackoverflow.com/a/2641293/420175.
    /// </remarks>
    public static Int64 GCD(Int64 a, Int64 b)
    {
        // Euclidean algorithm
        Int64 t;
        while (b != 0)
        {
            t = b;
            b = a % b;
            a = t;
        }
        return a;
    }
}'
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GCD needs a little correction for negative numbers:

def gcd(x,y):
  while y:
    if y<0:
      x,y=-x,-y
    x,y=y,x % y
    return x

def gcdl(*list):
  return reduce(gcd, *list)

def lcm(x,y):
  return x*y / gcd(x,y)

def lcml(*list):
  return reduce(lcm, *list)
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How about this?

from operator import mul as MULTIPLY

def factors(n):
    f = {} # a dict is necessary to create 'factor : exponent' pairs 
    divisor = 2
    while n > 1:
        while (divisor <= n):
            if n % divisor == 0:
                n /= divisor
                f[divisor] = f.get(divisor, 0) + 1
            else:
                divisor += 1
    return f


def mcm(numbers):
    #numbers is a list of numbers so not restricted to two items
    high_factors = {}
    for n in numbers:
        fn = factors(n)
        for (key, value) in fn.iteritems():
            if high_factors.get(key, 0) < value: # if fact not in dict or < val
                high_factors[key] = value
    return reduce (MULTIPLY, ((k ** v) for k, v in high_factors.items()))
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Better Javascript implementation:

function gcd(numbers) {
  return numbers.reduce(function gcd(a, b) {
    return b === 0 ? a : gcd(b, a % b);
  });
}

function lcm(numbers) {
  return numbers.reduce(function(a, b) {
    return Math.abs(a * b) / gcd(a, b);
  });
}
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