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I was arguing with a colleague about the dangers of using catch(...)

He was pointing me a possible use, rigorously implying that any catch(...) is followed by a trace/log: so as to help determining the origins of some unmanaged exceptions.

I am personnally rather skeptical about that. Do you know about any clear safe use of catch(...)

EDIT: For those interessested in the debate, my colleague has just pointed me to this question on Programmers site.

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closed as not constructive by Wooble, Zeta, ipc, bensiu, Shai Feb 7 '13 at 13:59

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1  
You don't need try/catch to print backtrace. –  ablm Feb 7 '13 at 13:31
    
I don't understand what you mean regarding the question ? –  Stephane Rolland Feb 7 '13 at 13:32
2  
What is a "trace/log" in this context? (as far as I know catch(...) doesn't launch anything). –  utnapistim Feb 7 '13 at 13:32
    
By "launches" I think he meant "is followed by". –  Daniel Daranas Feb 7 '13 at 13:34
    
not clear, but he said "trace/log" ... "origins of some unmanaged exceptions". for me it's a backtrace, or i miss something ? –  ablm Feb 7 '13 at 13:39
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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Exceptions are often overused. Almost always this overuse is accompanied by catch-all statements. This is usually a sign of a bad use and understanding of exceptions. I never recommend it. Sadly, at some (bad) place I worked in, other people enforced this policy.

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1  
Try writing the copy constructor of std::vector correctly without a generic catch block... –  Kerrek SB Feb 7 '13 at 13:33
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@DanielDaranas I understand you, this is the same very reason why I ask this question here :-) –  Stephane Rolland Feb 7 '13 at 13:39
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+1 @KerrekSB: Even that is possible, just write a helper class to manage the resources. –  ipc Feb 7 '13 at 13:40
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@ipc: Non-obligatorily: Would you care to demonstrate how you'd do that in an example (e.g. on ideone)? I'm curious. –  Kerrek SB Feb 7 '13 at 13:45
2  
@KerrekSB: Sorry, I've not that much time, but I wrote a dup with malloc and free. This should be pretty much the same idea as vector's copy constructor. –  ipc Feb 7 '13 at 14:31
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The clearest interesting safe use of catch(...) that I'm aware of is to offload code for handling various exceptions to a shared function:

void handle_error() {
    try {
        throw;
    } catch (TiresomelyPedanticException &) {
        # lah lah I don't care
        return;
    } catch (InterestingException &) {
        log_something();
        throw;
    }
    // etc. This catch chain may *or may not* need a catch(...)
    // of its own, it depends whether part of its job is to
    // deal with the "miscellaneous" case.
}

You use the function like this:

try {
    blah();
} catch(...) {
    handle_error();
}

... somewhere else ...

try {
    something_that_throws_the_same_exceptions_as_blah();
} catch (...) {
    handle_error();
}

The pattern above might turn out to be a bit of a C++03-ism, though. In C++11 it's so easy to write a capturing lambda, that the following might be more useful to callers, and there's no catch(...) in the pattern:

template <typename Func>
auto do_and_handle_error(Func f) -> decltype(f()) {
    try {
        return f();
    } // catch chain goes here
}

Use it like:

do_and_handle_error(blah);

or as would actually turn out to be necessary when blah takes arguments:

do_and_handle_error([&](void) { return blah(arg1,arg2); });

A boring use of catch(...) is to guarantee that the stack will be unwound before program termination:

int my_main() {
    RAIIClass some_object_i_want_to_get_destroyed_no_matter_what;
    some_code_that_might_throw();
    return 0;
}

int main() {
    try {
        return my_main();
    } catch (...) {
        throw;
    }
}

Without the catch, the standard leaves it either unspecified or implementation-defined whether or not some_object is destroyed if the code throws.

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Comedy comment: int main() { try -- why not int main() try {? –  Kerrek SB Feb 7 '13 at 13:39
1  
@KerrekSB: pure prejudice on my part against an oppressed and marginalized minority language feature ;-) –  Steve Jessop Feb 7 '13 at 13:41
    
Regarding your edit: I'm a bit lost with your try {throw;} -- is that legit? I mean, the exception is never active inside the original catch block, and isn't it instant termination to call throw; without an active exception? –  Kerrek SB Feb 7 '13 at 13:43
    
@KerrekSB: when handle_error() is called from inside a catch block, there's a throwable exception in play (I honestly can't remember at the moment whether "active" is the correct word for that, I have a sneaking feeling an "active exception" is one that has been thrown but not yet caught). The existence or not of an exception that can be thrown with an empty throw; statement is dynamically scoped, not lexically scoped. In effect it is a property of the current call stack, not of the block in which the code appears. –  Steve Jessop Feb 7 '13 at 13:48
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The following is always safe:

try
{
    some_local_stuff();
}
catch (...)
{
    clean_up_local_stuff();
    throw;
}

In other words, the catch-all catch block should only be used in conjunction with either rethrowing the exact same exception or storing exception pointer to transport the exception.

Catch blocks that make an exception go away entirely should be specific about the type of exception they handle.

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2  
Of course, the cleaning up should (nearly always) be done by destructors, but that's another story. –  Mike Seymour Feb 7 '13 at 13:31
    
... or unsafe code in destructors. –  utnapistim Feb 7 '13 at 13:31
    
@MikeSeymour: Errr.. what if you're writing the copy constructor of a vector?! –  Kerrek SB Feb 7 '13 at 13:33
    
@KerrekSB: Yeah, I should have been a bit less absolute. I've added a "nearly always" to appease the pedants. –  Mike Seymour Feb 7 '13 at 13:36
    
@MikeSeymour: I got that :-) My point is that in order to have all the wonderful rule-of-zero magic, someone has to write the component classes, and that's where the code I presented comes in as typical. –  Kerrek SB Feb 7 '13 at 13:38
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