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I am attempting to follow the AWS API for getting a JavaScript file from a private S3 bucket. The guide is here: Signing and Authenticating REST Requests

The environment is a browser with jQuery, so this is a JavaScript implementation. I have worked through what I considered to be the hard part - signing the request with the secret key. But now I am hung up on something supposedly easy. I have this resulting REST request to transmit:

GET /gss3/sayHello.js HTTP/1.1
Host: gss3.s3.amazonaws.com
Date: Thu Feb 07 2013 08:16:25 GMT-0500 (Eastern Standard Time)
Authorization: AWS AKIAJTURNBE6SXNTVVGQ:eWJOLZnj6Eja3CEC2CyifeURnxg=

Since this is a call to s3.amazonaws.com from www.mydomain.com, I was looking at JSONP to get around the same origin policy. However, I don't see any way to add extra headers to a jQuery JSONP call, and to authenticate with AWS you have to pass that 4th line:

Authorization: AWS AKIAJTURNBE6SXNTVVGQ:eWJOLZnj6Eja3CEC2CyifeURnxg=

So my question is this: how the heck do I transmit this REST request to AWS in my browser / jQuery environment? What am I missing here? Thanks gang....

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Although this source was written for PHP, the blog Amazon AWS S3 Query String Authentication with PHP shows how to compile a plain old querystring and pass the signature as a parameter to S3.

$url .= '?AWSAccessKeyId='.$awsKeyId
.'&Expires='.$expires
.'&Signature='.$signature;

Using the crypto-js and converting to Javascript then gives us something like this:

var filePath = "/bucket/file.js";
var dateTime = Math.floor(new Date().getTime() / 1000) + 300; // allows for 5 minutes clock diff
var stringToSign = "GET\n\n\n" + dateTime + "\n" + filePath;
var signature = CryptoJS.enc.Base64.stringify(CryptoJS.HmacSHA1(stringToSign, secretAccessKey));
var queryString = "?AWSAccessKeyId=" + accessKeyId + "&Expires=" + dateTime + "&Signature=" + encodeURIComponent(signature);

var script = document.createElement("script");
script.type = "text/javascript";
script.src = "https://s3.amazonaws.com/bucket/file.js" + queryString;
$("head").append(script); // jQuery version

And there you go, almost the whole banana written for you. I hope this helps someone out.

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You can't add headers to a JSON-P call as a JSON-P call is just a dynamic scrip tag appended to your webpage, unless S3 supports passing it as a GET param.

If you're using JSON-P then cross-domain issue no longer matter. As long as its valid JS it can be pulled in to your webpage from any domain. You just need to make sure the S3 file in question has a permission of viewable by anyone.

The last way to do it, is enable your S3 bucket with CORS (cross domain ajax) which is a new feature S3 supports. Then you can do vanilla ajax calls cross domain to your s3 bucket and add extra headers to your hearts content.

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re: your comment "You just need to make sure the S3 file in question has a permission of viewable by anyone", that is exactly what I am trying to AVOID by using the Authorization header. This is subscriber-only content. –  Geek Stocks Feb 8 '13 at 3:50
    
@GeekStocks, I just gave you the answer, that you can't set header with a JSON-P call, then gave ways to do it with and without open permissions. What else do you want? aws.amazon.com/about-aws/whats-new/2012/08/31/… –  Mauvis Ledford Feb 8 '13 at 18:56
    
The question was "how the heck do I transmit this REST request...", the topic reads "get a NON-public JavaScript file". Your answer didn't address the Authorization issue at all. You told me what I can't do instead of answer the Authorization issue. "What else do I want"? I dunno, how about accuracy? –  Geek Stocks Feb 9 '13 at 6:04
    
"The last way to do it, is enable your S3 bucket with CORS (cross domain ajax) which is a new feature S3 supports. Then you can do vanilla ajax calls cross domain to your s3 bucket and add extra headers to your hearts content." –  Mauvis Ledford Feb 9 '13 at 6:06
    
CORS, if you will read the docs, is for solving PUBLIC bucket cross-domain issues for non-javascript items which browsers require a preflight-check on (the docs use a web font file as an example). You don't use CORS as a substitute for the Authorization of a PRIVATE bucket. –  Geek Stocks Feb 9 '13 at 7:08

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