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I have a simple Client/Server app. The server is set up so that if no data comes in within N seconds a timeout occurs and the socket connection is closed. I do this via Socket.setSoTimeout(). That all works fine if the client hangs. If the clients dies, though (e.g. I kill it with Ctrl-C), then readLine() never times out.

Here's the server code, if that makes a difference:

public void run()
{
    PrintWriter out = null;
    BufferedReader in = null;

    try {
        sock.setSoTimeout(10000);

        out = new PrintWriter(sock.getOutputStream(), true);
        in = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(sock.getInputStream()));

        String input;
        while ((input = in.readLine()) != null) {

I've tried putting in a signal handler into the client to send an ABEND message over to the server but that's not working (I suspect the socket gets closed before the ABEND is sent, but I haven't really spent any time trying to figure that out).

Is there a way to wake up periodically and check the socket state to see if it's closed? Or (better yet) not have readLine() hang if the socket closes? Should I be using an unbuffered reader of some sort? Does an unbuffered reader supporting a readLine-like mechanism exist?

I am using Java 6 on Linux.

EDIT: I'm killing the client myself during an idle period; all data has been sent and received at this point. I have verified (via ps) that the client program is no longer running; the Java process has indeed been killed. Using netstat I can see that the socket is closed, on both ends, yet readLine() still hangs.

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see stackoverflow.com/questions/1577719/… - perhaps client got killed just after CR was sent and readLine() never consumed LF, thus it's wainting for it forever –  mantrid Feb 7 '13 at 14:33
    
I'm killing the client myself during an idle period; all data has been sent and received at this point. –  Joe Casadonte Feb 7 '13 at 14:44
    
What kind of Socket? TCP or UDP? –  ecbrodie Feb 7 '13 at 16:08
    
It's a TCP socket. –  Joe Casadonte Feb 7 '13 at 16:17
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think you have misdiagnosed the problem.

If the input side of the socket has been closed, then the readLine() call should see that close. After all buffered data has been consumed, the call should return a null. (You won't get an IOException if the socket is closed normally, but you could get one if the connection times out ... for example.)

The most obvious explanation is that the socket has not been closed yet. Take a look at the circumstances in which the other end will close the socket, and figure out why this hasn't happened yet.


None of these is the solution, but I'll answer for completeness.

Is there a way to wake up periodically and check the socket state to see if it's closed?

Another thread could do that, but not this one.

Or (better yet) not have readLine() hang if the socket closes?

That's what is supposed to happen.

Should I be using an unbuffered reader of some sort?

It wouldn't help. You'd end up having to implement readLine() yourself, and your code would block at the same point. The blocking behaviour is happening below the buffering and character decoding layers of the reader chain.

Does an unbuffered reader supporting a readLine-like mechanism exist?

No it doesn't. See above.

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"The most obvious explanation is that the socket has not been closed yet." -- the client program is no longer running; the Java process has been killed. Using netstat I can see that the socket is indeed closed, on both ends, yet readLine() still hangs. I'll add this info above. –  Joe Casadonte Feb 7 '13 at 14:59
    
Can you provide an SSCCE for this? sscce.org What you are reporting goes counter my experience ... –  Stephen C Feb 7 '13 at 15:39
    
See working code below. Thanks for the help, sorry to waste your time. –  Joe Casadonte Feb 7 '13 at 18:34
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Don't you hate it when you spend hours chasing down a problem that isn't there? In my attempt to provide the SSCCE for Stephen C I found that I couldn't provide such an example because it is working. My debug code was creating the issue...

For the record, here is working code (in case anyone else has a similar problem):

sscceServer.java

import java.io.BufferedReader;
import java.io.InputStreamReader;
import java.io.PrintWriter;
import java.net.InetAddress;
import java.net.ServerSocket;
import java.net.Socket;


public class sscceServer
{
    public static class EchoHandlerThread implements Runnable
    {
        private final Socket sock;
        private final int id;

        public EchoHandlerThread(Socket s, int i)
        {
            sock = s;
            id = i;
        }

        public void run()
        {
            try {
                //----- set socket read timeout to 10 seconds -----
                sock.setSoTimeout(10000);

                PrintWriter out = new PrintWriter(sock.getOutputStream(), true);
                BufferedReader in = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(sock.getInputStream()));

                String input;
                while ((input = in.readLine()) != null) {
                    System.out.println("[" + id + "] <" + input + ">");
                }

                out.close();
                in.close();
                sock.close();

                System.out.println("\tConnection #" + id + " closed");
            }
            catch (Exception ex) {
                throw new RuntimeException(ex);
            }
        }
    }

    public static class Listener
    {
        private final InetAddress bindip;
        private final int portnum;

        public Listener(String ipstr, int pn)
        {
            try {
                bindip = InetAddress.getByName(ipstr);
                portnum = pn;
            }
            catch (Exception ex) {
                throw new RuntimeException(ex);
            }
        }

        public void start()
        {
            try {
                ServerSocket srvsock = new ServerSocket(portnum, 0, bindip);
                System.out.println("Listening on " + bindip.getHostAddress() + ":" + portnum);

                int connum = 0;
                while (true) {
                    Socket sock = srvsock.accept();

                    connum++;
                    InetAddress ipaddr = sock.getInetAddress();
                    System.out.println("Connection #" + connum + " from: " + ipaddr.getHostAddress());

                    new Thread(new EchoHandlerThread(sock, connum)).start();
                }
            }
            catch (Exception ex) {
                throw new RuntimeException(ex);
            }
        }
    }


    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        Listener lsnr = new Listener("localhost", 8988);
        lsnr.start();
    }
}

sscceClient.java

import java.io.BufferedReader;
import java.io.InputStreamReader;
import java.io.PrintWriter;
import java.net.Socket;

public final class sscceClient
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        try {
            Socket sock = new Socket("localhost", 8909);

            PrintWriter out = new PrintWriter(sock.getOutputStream(), true);
            BufferedReader in = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(sock.getInputStream()));

            out.println("Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit.");
            out.println("Ut sem ante, mollis ut porttitor at, aliquet vel nulla.");
            out.println("Suspendisse quis sapien ante, a cursus nunc.");

            //---- sleep for 20 seconds -----
            Thread.sleep(20000);

            out.close();
            in.close();
            sock.close();
        }
        catch (Exception ex) {
            throw new RuntimeException(ex);
        }
    }
}

Thanks for the help!

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According to the Javadoc, the readLine() method will throw an IOException. And according to IOException's Javadoc, the exception is expected tobe thrown on an interrupt. Without writing code, I would say that you can handle the case of the stream closing prematurely by catching IOException.

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The problem is, though, that the interrupt is never thrown. –  Joe Casadonte Feb 7 '13 at 15:03
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