Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In the markup shown below, I'm trying to get the content div to stretch all the way to the bottom of the page but it's only stretching if there's content to display. The reason I want to do this is so the vertical border still appears down the page even if there isn't any content to display.

Here is my HTML:

<body>
    <form id="form1">
    <div id="header">
        <a title="Home" href="index.html" />
    </div>

    <div id="menuwrapper">
        <div id="menu">
        </div>
    </div>

    <div id="content">
    </div>

And my CSS:

body {
    font-family: Trebuchet MS, Verdana, MS Sans Serif;
    font-size:0.9em;
    margin:0;
    padding:0;
}
div#header {
    width: 100%;
    height: 100px;
}
#header a {
    background-position: 100px 30px;
    background: transparent url(site-style-images/sitelogo.jpg) no-repeat fixed 100px 30px;
    height: 80px;
    display: block;
}
#header, #menuwrapper {
    background-repeat: repeat;
    background-image: url(site-style-images/darkblue_background_color.jpg);
}
#menu #menuwrapper {
    height:25px;
}
div#menuwrapper {
    width:100%
}
#menu, #content {
    width:1024px;
    margin: 0 auto;
}
div#menu {
    height: 25px;
    background-color:#50657a;
}
share|improve this question
    
What do you want it to do if there is more content then can fit on the page? What browsers do you care about? –  drs9222 Jul 25 '09 at 23:49

18 Answers 18

up vote 56 down vote accepted

Your problem is not that the div is not at 100% height, but that the container around it is not.This will help in the browser I suspect you are using:

html,body { height:100%; }

You may need to adjust padding and margins as well, but this will get you 90% of the way there.If you need to make it work with all browsers you will have to mess around with it a bit.

This site has some excellent examples:

http://www.brunildo.org/test/html_body_0.html
http://www.brunildo.org/test/html_body_11b.html
http://www.brunildo.org/test/index.html

I also recommend going to http://quirksmode.org/

-Jason

share|improve this answer
10  
This solution isn't friendly to pages that scroll. –  jbranchaud Jul 12 '11 at 18:01
3  
min-height property in CSS should help him out... I guess –  Alfabravo Dec 2 '11 at 21:21
    
Interestingly this sorted my scrolling problems as opposed to causing them –  Alan Macdonald Mar 17 at 17:22

Try Faux Columns

share|improve this answer

Try playing around with the following css rule:

#content {
    min-height: 600px;
    height: auto !important;
    height: 600px;
}

Change the height to suit your page. height is mentioned twice for cross browser compatibility.

share|improve this answer
    
this works, but I found that if I increase min-height to more than 600px, it creates a scroll. Would you have any idea why this is happening? –  Siddharth Patel Dec 7 '14 at 14:23
1  
@SiddharthPatel Because the #content div is overflowing its parent. So set the parent of the #content div to have an overflow:auto or overflow:hidden css value and it should expand/overflow to fit, rather than scroll. Would probably be better to pose such questions as new questions next time rather than comments :) –  Colt McCormack Jan 20 at 19:34

Try Ryan Fait's "Sticky Footer" solution,

http://ryanfait.com/sticky-footer/
http://ryanfait.com/resources/footer-stick-to-bottom-of-page/

Works across IE, Firefox, Chrome, Safari and supposedly Opera too, but haven't tested that. It's a great solution. Very easy and reliable to implement.

share|improve this answer

you can kinda hack it with the min-height declaration

<div style="min-height: 100%">stuff</div>
share|improve this answer

The min-height property is not supported by all browsers. If you need your #content to extend it's height on longer pages the height property will cut it short.

It's a bit of a hack but you could add an empty div with a width of 1px and height of e.g. 1000px inside your #content div. That will force the content to be at least 1000px high and still allow longer content to extend the height when needed

share|improve this answer

I'll try to answer the question directly in the title, rather than being hell-bent on sticking a footer to the bottom of the page.

Make div extend to the bottom of the page if there's not enough content to fill the available vertical browser viewport:

Demo at (drag the frame handle to see effect) : http://jsfiddle.net/NN7ky
(upside: clean, simple. downside: requires flexbox - http://caniuse.com/flexbox)

HTML:

<body>

  <div class=div1>
    div1<br>
    div1<br>
    div1<br>
  </div>

  <div class=div2>
    div2<br>
    div2<br>
    div2<br>
  </div>

</body>

CSS:

* { padding: 0; margin: 0; }

html, body {
  height: 100%;

  display: flex;
  flex-direction: column;
}

body > * {
  flex-shrink: 0;
}

.div1 { background-color: yellow; }

.div2 {
  background-color: orange;
  flex-grow: 1;
}

ta-da - or i'm just too sleepy

share|improve this answer
    
flex technology It's not working in all pre-modern browsers. –  Blackersoul Jun 26 '14 at 10:23
    
Some of us are fortunate enough to only support "modern" browsers so this was incredibly useful to me. Thanks Gima. I tried several ways of doing something like this but it was always broken in various subtle ways. This is much better. Still don't exactly understand why it works this way. –  Chris Nicola Jul 20 '14 at 5:13
    
Flexbox element tries to divide it's content area among the elements in it. The solution I offered works by 1) deny shrinking of divs, and 2) enable growing of .div2. Hence divs don't shrink to hide their content, and only .div2 is allowed to expand. –  Gima Jul 20 '14 at 13:41

While it isn't as elegant as pure CSS, a small bit of javascript can help accomplish this:

<html>
<head>
<style type='text/css'>
    div {
        border: 1px solid #000000;
    } 
</style>
<script type='text/javascript'>

    function expandToWindow(element) {
         var margin = 10; 

         if (element.style.height < window.innerHeight) { 
            element.style.height = window.innerHeight - (2 * margin) 
         }
    }


</script>
</head>
<body onload='expandToWindow(document.getElementById("content"));'>
<div id='content'>Hello World</div>
</body>
</html>
share|improve this answer

Sticky footer with fixed height:

HTML scheme:

<body>
   <div id="wrap">
   </div>
   <div id="footer">
   </div>
</body>

CSS:

html, body {
    height: 100%;
}
#wrap {
    min-height: 100%;
    height: auto !important;
    height: 100%;
    margin: 0 auto -60px;
}
#footer {
    height: 60px;
}
share|improve this answer

Try:

html, body {
    height: 102%;
}
.wrapper {
    position: relative;
    height: 100%;
    width: 100%;
}
.div {
    position: absolute;
    top: 0;
    bottom: 0;
    width: 1000px;
    min-height: 100%;
}

Haven't tested it yet...

share|improve this answer

Try http://mystrd.at/modern-clean-css-sticky-footer/

Demo:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<head>
    <meta charset="UTF-8">
    <meta name="author" content="http://mystrd.at">
    <meta name="robots" content="noindex, nofollow">
    <title>James Dean CSS Sticky Footer</title>
    <style type="text/css">
        html {
            position: relative;
            min-height: 100%;
        }
        body {
            margin: 0 0 100px;
            /* bottom = footer height */
            padding: 25px;
        }
        footer {
            background-color: orange;
            position: absolute;
            left: 0;
            bottom: 0;
            height: 100px;
            width: 100%;
            overflow: hidden;
        }
    </style>
</head>
<body>
    <article>
        <!-- or <div class="container">, etc. -->
        <h1>James Dean CSS Sticky Footer</h1>

        <p>Blah blah blah blah</p>
        <p>More blah blah blah</p>
    </article>
    <footer>
        <h1>Footer Content</h1>
    </footer>
</body>

</html>
share|improve this answer

Also you might like this: http://matthewjamestaylor.com/blog/ultimate-2-column-left-menu-pixels.htm

It isn't quite what you asked for, but it might also suit your needs.

share|improve this answer

Depending on how your layout works, you might get away with setting the background on the <html> element, which is always at least the height of the viewport.

share|improve this answer

It is not possible to accomplish this using only stylesheets (CSS). Some browsers will not accept

height: 100%;

as a higher value than the viewpoint of the browser window.

Javascript is the easiest cross browser solution, though as mentioned, not a clean or beautiful one.

share|improve this answer

Not the very best nor the best implementation of the greatest standards, but you can change the DIV for a SPAN... It's a not so recommendable but fast fix =P =)

share|improve this answer

I dont have the code, but I know I did this once using a combination of height:1000px and margin-bottom: -1000px; Try that.

share|improve this answer

I know this is not the best method, but I couldnt figure it out without messing my header, menu, etc positions. So.... I used a table for those two colums. It was a QUICK fix. No JS needed ;)

share|improve this answer

Kevin Read's comment as reiterated below worked for me! I'd vote it up but at the time I don't have enough reputation!

#content {
min-height: 600px;
height: auto !important;
height: 600px;
}
share|improve this answer

protected by Mr. Alien Aug 4 '13 at 6:38

Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality answers, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site.

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.