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When defining a JS object with a constructor function, is there any way to avoid having to use "this" with every single object property? It seems very ugly. E.g.

function Thingy(abc) {
  this.var1 = abc;
  this.var2 = this.var1 + " hello ";
  // etc
}

var myObj = new Thingy();

It seems that I should be able to use "var var2" and then leave out the "this" and just refer to "var2", but am I missing something?

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You can avoid to use them. But they provide some lisibility in some cases, and avoid ambiguity when variables with the same name but different scopes. –  X.L.Ant Feb 7 '13 at 13:58
    
You can easily use var var2 = 42 and refer to the value as var2, but the question is, what purpose your function has?! –  Amberlamps Feb 7 '13 at 13:59
    
You can do var var2, but if you do, var2 will only be accessable inside Thingy (it'll be private). –  Rocket Hazmat Feb 7 '13 at 14:00
1  
You can use var, but it will make the variables private. As in, the only place you have access to them is your function's scope. You wouldn't be able to use myObj.var1 –  Ian Feb 7 '13 at 14:00

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Well, I'm afraid that you're running into how the language is designed.

But there is a sense in which you can use the plain var statements from the constructor. Any functions created in there have access to the closure that includes these properties:

function Thingy(abc) {
    var var1 = abc;
    this.func1 = function(str) {return var1 + ", hello";};
}

var thing1 = new Thingy("Dan");
thing1.func1();  // => "Dan, hello"

Note this is how you can encapsulate entirely private variables in an object, so it's often a useful technique.

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Thanks! This would seem to be the best "default" way to do it in fact, the only difference I can see is that thing1.var1 is no longer accessible, giving more privacy and much cleaner code. Strange that all the examples I have found using this object constructor method use the "this". –  Dan Feb 25 '13 at 11:20
    
There is a substantial downside to this as well, though. Note that prototype functions do not have access to this property. The language forces tradeoffs between extreme encapsulation and better memory management. –  Scott Sauyet Feb 25 '13 at 12:18

You can use any object you like and simply return it at the end e.g.:

function Thingy(abc) {
  var thingy = {};
  thingy.var1 = abc;
  thingy.var2 = thingy.var1 + " hello ";
  return thingy;
}

Or

function Thingy(abc) {
  var thingy = {
    var1: abc,
    var2: abc + " hello "
  };
  return thingy;
}

Or

function Thingy(abc) {
  return {
    var1: abc,
    var2: abc + " hello "
  };
}

Or

function Thingy(abc) {
  var var1 = abc,
      var2 = var1;
  var2 += " hello ";
  return {
    var1: var1,
    var2: var2
  };
}
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1  
But of course many of those introduce certain inefficiencies, throwing away the initially created this object. –  Scott Sauyet Feb 7 '13 at 14:01
    
I didn't say it was more efficient, I simply answered his question :) –  Luke Bennett Feb 7 '13 at 15:04

Nope, there's no way to avoid it. You need to use this to assign variables to an object.

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2  
provide a quote to support your statement? –  Samuel Liew Feb 7 '13 at 14:00
2  
@Samuel: What kind of quote would you expect? If you'd write var1 = ... you would create a global variable (or assign the value to a variable defined in a higher scope). var var1 = ... would create a local variable. Assigning a property to an object is always done with obj.propertyName = ..., so you have to use this.propertyName = .... I can quote the spec if you want: es5.github.com ;) –  Felix Kling Feb 7 '13 at 14:18
1  
@FelixKling So what's wrong with creating a local variable and using a "getter"? The OP asked if there were any way to avoid using this. I think ScottSauyet's answer is correct. At the same time, it depends what the OP is trying to do, to determine what's worth what. And it's not like it's using a lot of extra/confusing code or something to make it crazy. But his answer is definitely applicable, so the answer "Nope" doesn't seem right to me. –  Ian Feb 7 '13 at 14:23
1  
@Ian: I thought that was what I said! :-) –  Scott Sauyet Feb 7 '13 at 14:38
1  
@ScottSauyet Yeah I think I just needed to type it out myself to make sure I understood :) –  Ian Feb 7 '13 at 14:40

try

function Thingy(abc) {
  with(this)
  {
    var1 = abc;
    var2 = this.var1 + " hello ";
  // etc
  }
}

https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/JavaScript/Reference/Statements/with

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1  
I'm upvoting this with the caveat that it is not very good programming practice... Too confusing for the developer to know that 'var1' means 'this.var1'... My $0.02... –  Steve H. Feb 7 '13 at 14:07
1  
with does not work this way and will throw an error in strict mode. This will create var1 and var2 in global scope. –  Felix Kling Feb 7 '13 at 14:10

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