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I'm creating simple self-extracting archive using magic number to mark the beginning of the content. For now it is a textfile:

MAGICNUMBER .... content of the text file

Next, textfile copied to the end of the executable:

copy programm.exe/b+textfile.txt/b sfx.exe

I'm trying to find the second occurrence of the magic number (the first one would be a hardcoded constant obviously) using the following code:

    string my_filename = System.Diagnostics.Process.GetCurrentProcess().MainModule.FileName;
    StreamReader file = new StreamReader(my_filename);
    const int block_size = 1024;
    const string magic = "MAGICNUMBER";
    char[] buffer = new Char[block_size];
    Int64 count = 0;
    Int64 glob_pos = 0;
    bool flag = false;
    while (file.ReadBlock(buffer, 0, block_size) > 0)
    {
        var rel_pos = buffer.ToString().IndexOf(magic);
        if ((rel_pos > -1) & (!flag))
        {
            flag = true;
            continue;
        }

        if ((rel_pos > -1) & (flag == true))
        {
            glob_pos = block_size * count + rel_pos;
            break;
        }
        count++;
    }



    using (FileStream fs = new FileStream(my_filename, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read))
    {
        byte[] b = new byte[fs.Length - glob_pos];
        fs.Seek(glob_pos, SeekOrigin.Begin);
        fs.Read(b, 0, (int)(fs.Length - glob_pos));
        File.WriteAllBytes("c:/output.txt", b);

but for some reason I'm copying almost entire file, not the last few kilobytes. Is it because of the compiler optimization, inlining magic constant in while loop of something similar?

How should I do self-extraction archive properly?

Guessed I should read file backwards to avoid problems of compiler inlining magic constant multiply times. So I've modified my code in the following way:

    string my_filename = System.Diagnostics.Process.GetCurrentProcess().MainModule.FileName;
    StreamReader file = new StreamReader(my_filename);
    const int block_size = 1024;
    const string magic = "MAGIC";
    char[] buffer = new Char[block_size];
    Int64 count = 0;
    Int64 glob_pos = 0;
    while (file.ReadBlock(buffer, 0, block_size) > 0)
    {
        var rel_pos = buffer.ToString().IndexOf(magic);
        if (rel_pos > -1)
        {
            glob_pos = block_size * count + rel_pos;
        }
        count++;
    }



    using (FileStream fs = new FileStream(my_filename, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read))
    {
        byte[] b = new byte[fs.Length - glob_pos];
        fs.Seek(glob_pos, SeekOrigin.Begin);
        fs.Read(b, 0, (int)(fs.Length - glob_pos));
        File.WriteAllBytes("c:/output.txt", b);
    }

So I've scanned the all file once, found that I though would be the last occurrence of the magic number and copied from here to the end of it. While the file created by this procedure seems smaller than in previous attempt it in no way the same file I've attached to my "self-extracting" archive. Why?

My guess is that position calculation of the beginning of the attached file is wrong due to used conversion from binary to string. If so how should I modify my position calculation to make it correct?

Also how should I choose magic number then working with real files, pdfs for example? I wont be able to modify pdfs easily to include predefined magic number in it.

share|improve this question
1  
Are you familiar with serialization? Although reading/writing raw binary works, it's usually much, much simpler (and less error prone) to use serialization to encode data. Or even, just read the entire file into memory (assuming that's a feisable option), make the changes and then save them to disk. –  sircodesalot Feb 7 '13 at 14:43
    
@sircodesalot Sounds good. I would appreciate a link to some kind of example though. –  Moonwalker Feb 7 '13 at 14:57
    
Yup, I'll write one up real quick. –  sircodesalot Feb 7 '13 at 15:02
1  
take a look at this project: codeproject.com/Articles/339768/… –  Alex Feb 7 '13 at 15:56
    
Look at the resulting files. Do thy really have the magic string in the beginning? –  Ark-kun Feb 10 '13 at 21:50
show 3 more comments

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted
+25

The easiest solution is to replace

const string magic = "MAGICNUMBER";

with

static string magic = "magicnumber".ToUpper();

But there are more problems with the whole magic string approach. What is the file contains the magic string? I think that the best solution is to put the file size after the file. The extraction is much easier that way: Read the length from the last bytes and read the required amount of bytes from the end of the file.

Update: This should work unless your files are very big. (You'd need to use a revolving pair of buffers in that case (to read the file in small blocks)):

string inputFilename = System.Diagnostics.Process.GetCurrentProcess().MainModule.FileName;
string outputFilename = inputFilename + ".secret";
string magic = "magic".ToUpper();

byte[] data = File.ReadAllBytes(inputFilename);
byte[] magicData = Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes(magic);

for (int idx = magicData.Length - 1; idx < data.Length; idx++) {
    bool found = true;
    for (int magicIdx = 0; magicIdx < magicData.Length; magicIdx++) {
        if (data[idx - magicData.Length + 1 + magicIdx] != magicData[magicIdx]) {
            found = false;
            break;
        }
    }
    if (found) {
        using (FileStream output = new FileStream(outputFilename, FileMode.Create)) {
            output.Write(data, idx + 1, data.Length - idx - 1);
        }
    }
}

Update2: This should be much faster, use little memory and work on files of all size, but the program your must be proper executable (with size being a multiple of 512 bytes):

string inputFilename = System.Diagnostics.Process.GetCurrentProcess().MainModule.FileName;
string outputFilename = inputFilename + ".secret";
string marker = "magic".ToUpper();

byte[] data = File.ReadAllBytes(inputFilename);
byte[] markerData = Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes(marker);
int markerLength = markerData.Length;

const int blockSize = 512; //important!

using(FileStream input = File.OpenRead(inputFilename)) {
    long lastPosition = 0;
    byte[] buffer = new byte[blockSize];
    while (input.Read(buffer, 0, blockSize) >= markerLength) {
        bool found = true;
        for (int idx = 0; idx < markerLength; idx++) {
            if (buffer[idx] != markerData[idx]) {
                found = false;
                break;
            }
        }
        if (found) {
            input.Position = lastPosition + markerLength;
            using (FileStream output = File.OpenWrite(outputFilename)) {
                input.CopyTo(output);
            }
        }
        lastPosition = input.Position;
    }
}

Read about some approaches here: http://www.strchr.com/creating_self-extracting_executables

share|improve this answer
    
As I understand normal self extracting archives are searching for archive signature in themselves, not writing the numbers of bytes to be read in the end of file. Why? –  Moonwalker Feb 11 '13 at 7:27
    
@Moonwalker I've updated my answer with full working code. –  Ark-kun Feb 13 '13 at 23:53
add comment

Try this out. Some C# Stream IO 101:

    public static void Main()
    {
        String path = @"c:\here is your path";

        // Method A: Read all information into a Byte Stream
        Byte[] data = System.IO.File.ReadAllBytes(path);
        String[] lines = System.IO.File.ReadAllLines(path);

        // Method B: Use a stream to do essentially the same thing. (More powerful)
        // Using block essentially means 'close when we're done'. See 'using block' or 'IDisposable'.
        using (FileStream stream = File.OpenRead(path))
        using (StreamReader reader = new StreamReader(stream))
        {
            // This will read all the data as a single string
            String allData = reader.ReadToEnd();
        }

        String outputPath = @"C:\where I'm writing to";

        // Copy from one file-stream to another
        using (FileStream inputStream = File.OpenRead(path))
        using (FileStream outputStream = File.Create(outputPath))
        {
            inputStream.CopyTo(outputStream);

            // Again, this will close both streams when done.
        }

        // Copy to an in-memory stream
        using (FileStream inputStream = File.OpenRead(path))
        using (MemoryStream outputStream = new MemoryStream())
        {
            inputStream.CopyTo(outputStream);

            // Again, this will close both streams when done.
            // If you want to hold the data in memory, just don't wrap your 
            // memory stream in a using block.
        }

        // Use serialization to store data.
        var serializer = new System.Runtime.Serialization.Formatters.Binary.BinaryFormatter();

        // We'll serialize a person to the memory stream.
        MemoryStream memoryStream = new MemoryStream();
        serializer.Serialize(memoryStream, new Person() { Name = "Sam", Age = 20 });

        // Now the person is stored in the memory stream (just as easy to write to disk using a 
        // file stream as well.

        // Now lets reset the stream to the beginning:
        memoryStream.Seek(0, SeekOrigin.Begin);

        // And deserialize the person
        Person deserializedPerson = (Person)serializer.Deserialize(memoryStream);

        Console.WriteLine(deserializedPerson.Name); // Should print Sam

    }

    // Mark Serializable stuff as serializable.
    // This means that C# will automatically format this to be put in a stream
    [Serializable]
    class Person
    {
        public String Name { get; set; }
        public Int32 Age { get; set; }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I will try this out –  Moonwalker Feb 7 '13 at 16:07
    
Well it seems the actual problem is not the serialization but rather my inability to find the magic number separating the files. –  Moonwalker Feb 9 '13 at 23:30
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You can add the compressed file as resource to the project itself:

Project > Properties
enter image description here

Set the property of this resource to Binary.

You can then retrieve the resource with

byte[] resource = Properties.Resources.NameOfYourResource;
share|improve this answer
    
This only works only during compilation step, no? I want to be able to create self extracting archives from stand alone program. –  Moonwalker Feb 7 '13 at 16:09
    
@Moonwalker: You can add a resource to a finished exe. It's slightly more complicated than just appending a ZIP file after the exe, but not all that much. And instead of searching the exe, it's "indexed". –  Luaan Jan 7 at 15:50
add comment

Search backwards rather than forwards (assuming your file won't contain said magic number).

Or append your (text) file and then lastly its length (or the length of the original exe), so you only need read the last DWORD / few bytes to see how long the file is - then no magic number is required.

More robustly, store the file as an additional data section within the executable file. This is more fiddly without external tools as it requires knowledge of the PE file format used for NT executables, q.v. http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms809762.aspx

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