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I'm having a problem passing an array to a function in C. I declare the array in main

And then, inside of a function, I populate it.

At which point I leave my function and pass the array to another function with the prototype

And make an attempt to access the array.

However once I am out of the initial function that populated the array, I am unable to access the array. It just returns values of 0.00000 and nan.

void ReadData(FILE *fpIn, int lines, double *pA );
void MinMaxAvg(double *pA, double *min, double *max, double *avg, int lines);

int main()
{
    FILE *fpIn = NULL;

    int lines = 0;

    double *pA = NULL;

    ReadData(fpIn, lines, pA);

    double min = 0;
    double max = 0;
    double avg = 0;

    MinMaxAvg(pA, &min, &max, &avg, lines);

    printf("%lf %s %lf %s %lf \n", avg, " ", min, " ", max);

    return 0;
}   

void ReadData(FILE *fpIn, int lines, double *pA )
{
    char fName[20];
    scanf( "%s", fName);

    fpIn = fopen ( fName, "rt");
// fpIn = fopen( "test1.txt", "rt");

    if ( fpIn == NULL)
    {
        printf( "Unable to open: ");
        exit(99);
    }

//Gets Lines

//int lines=0;
    char ch;

    while((ch=fgetc(fpIn))!=EOF)
    {
        if (ch=='\n') { lines++; }

    }

// clearerr(fName *fpIn);
    fclose(fpIn);
    fopen(fName, "rt");

//Makes Array

//double *pA;

    pA = (double *)malloc(lines*sizeof(double));

//Fills Array

    for (int i=0; i<lines; i++)
    {
        fscanf(fpIn, "%lf", &pA[i]);
    }

    for (int i=0; i<lines; i++)
    {
        printf("%lf \n", pA[i]);
    }
}

void MinMaxAvg(double *pA, double *min, double *max, double *avg, int lines)
{
    double total = 0;

    for (int i=0; i<lines; i++)
    {
        if ( i==0)
        {
            *min = pA[0];
            *max = pA[0];
        }
        else
        {
            if (pA[i] < *min)
            {
                *min = pA[i];
            }

            if (pA[i] > *max)
            {
                *max = pA[i];
            }
        }

        total += pA[i];

    }

    *avg = (total / (double)lines);

}

Any Suggestions?

Thanks!

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marked as duplicate by larsmans, WhozCraig, finnw, code_burgar, Frank Shearar Feb 7 '13 at 19:29

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
That's not an array, that's a pointer. Also, how do you "leave your function"? Do you return pA? –  larsmans Feb 7 '13 at 14:38
    
It's a pointer to an array. And no the function is void. I'm passing the array in by reference same as I do in the MinMaxAvg function. This worked perfect before I tried to allocate the array in the first function... –  aprohl5 Feb 7 '13 at 14:42
1  
I don't see anything wrong here. It must be something in the part you don't show us. –  KBart Feb 7 '13 at 14:45
    
What would you like to see? I can add to the question. –  aprohl5 Feb 7 '13 at 14:46
2  
In ReadData, you have fclose(fpIn); fopen(fname, "rt");, and after that you call fscanf(fpIn,...). There's no reason to believe the second fopen returns the same pointer as the first. Make it fpIn = fopen(fname, "rt"); and check for NULL again. –  Daniel Fischer Feb 7 '13 at 15:30
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3 Answers

I have just tested your code and it works. The only difference i made is stdin in fscanf and have included max,min,avg and lines.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>


void MinMaxAvg(double *pA, double *min, double *max, double *avg, int lines)
{
    double total = 0;

    for (int i=0; i<lines; i++)
    {
    if ( i==0)
    {
        *min = pA[0];
        *max = pA[0];
    }
    else
    {
        if (pA[i] < *min)
        {
        *min = pA[i];
        }

        if (pA[i] > *max)
        {
        *max = pA[i];
        }
    }

    total += pA[i];

    }

    *avg = (total / (double)lines);

return;
}



int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
    double *pA = NULL;

    int lines = 3;

    double min,max,avg;

    pA = (double *)malloc(lines*sizeof(double));

    //Fills Array

    for (int i=0; i<lines; i++)
    {
        fscanf(stdin, "%lf", &pA[i]);
    }

     MinMaxAvg( pA, &min, &max, &avg,  lines);


    for (int i=0; i<lines; i++)
    {
        printf("%lf \n", pA[i]);
    }

    printf( "min: %f  max: %f  avg: %f" , min , max , avg );
}
share|improve this answer
    
Well yeah, it works great if you allocate the array in main. I run into the problem when I'm allocating the array in the function ReadData(). –  aprohl5 Feb 7 '13 at 15:00
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You counted number of lines in the file into local variable "lines" in function ReadData(), but this does not mean that it is passed back to main. The "lines" variable value which is passed to MinMaxAvg() is zero.

share|improve this answer
    
I like the idea on that however as soon as I implement it the rest of the code breaks. I am suddenly unable to get past the scanf ("%s", fName); it keeps freezing up on me. I have no clue how the two influence each other though... –  aprohl5 Feb 7 '13 at 15:23
    
As Daniel Fischer wrote above there is not a good idea: fclose(fpIn); fopen(fName, "rt"); ... ch=fgetc(fpIn); Try this way instead: fseek(fpIn, 0L, SEEK_SET); –  oleg_g Feb 7 '13 at 18:02
    
Thank you. I actually went with the route of rewind(fpIn) but I will keep the fseek() method in mind for future uses. –  aprohl5 Feb 7 '13 at 18:05
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Based on what you have in your questions, if you are populating pA in a function I suspect you are not changing the contents of pA, which may be the issues. It may be helpful/useful to see the routine you are using to populate pA.

C functions call by value if so you are just passing in a pointer (just pA), to change the value of the pointer, you need to pass the address of the pointer (pointer to a pointer if you will). Then you need to deference once it to set the pointer (to the pointer) and then deference it twice to set the values in allocated memory/array.

So the calling to the function is

void init(File *fpin, double **pA, int lines)
{
  /* Deference once to set the pointer to the pitner */
  *pA = (double *)malloc(lines*sizeof(double));

  for (int i=0; i<lines; i++)
  {
     /* deference twice to set the the element of the pointer to the pointer */
     fscanf(fpIn, "%lf", &(**pA)[i]);
  }
}

and then in calling the routine, you need to pass in the address of pA.

init(fpIn,&pA,lines);

Here is a link which might help explain pointers to pointers: http://www.thegeekstuff.com/2012/01/advanced-c-pointers/

It has been a long time since I have done pointers to pointers, but if you use the above, you may have to make some minor changes.

As larsmans is hinting, I like his suggestion of changing the routine to return the pointer to the memory you allocated and place that value in pA.

double* init(File *fpin, int lines)
{
  double *local = (double *)malloc(lines*sizeof(double));

  //Fills Array

  for (int i=0; i<lines; i++)
  {
    fscanf(fpIn, "%lf", &local[i]);
  }

  return(local);

}

and then in the calling to init

pA = init(fpIn,lines);

Depending upon what you are trying to accomplish, this may be easier to understand and not quite as complex.

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