Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have two date properties and they are exactly the same as i am mapping from one object to another. If I compare them as below it returns false:

if(obj1.d1 == obj2.d1)
{
}

both of them are {01/06/2011 15:44:32}.

I cannot use DateTime.Compare as they are nullable. what would be the best way to compare nullable dates?

share|improve this question
2  
Are the Ticks also identical? Because I cannot reproduce the issue, with two Nullable<DateTime>-objects created separately from each other but holding the same values... –  Spontifixus Feb 7 '13 at 14:52
1  
Unless I'm missing something else, that should work anyway? –  Arran Feb 7 '13 at 14:52
    
@Spontifixus you are right the ticks are different... –  Zaki Feb 7 '13 at 14:59
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Check the actual ticks of those dates, they might be different. Note that DateTime records 100 ns intervals as its smallest unit. Those aren't shown when you format the DateTime.

share|improve this answer
    
you are right the ticks are different.. can i compare without ticks..also they both come from same database column –  Zaki Feb 7 '13 at 15:01
1  
@Sam1 If the ticks are different, then they're not the same in the database. You are just looking at the rounded output to the nearest second. If you want to compare without regard to milliseconds, you'll have to round the values first. –  Matt Johnson Feb 7 '13 at 15:04
    
@MattJohnson thanks for the comment. can you please explain what you mean by round up? –  Zaki Feb 7 '13 at 15:07
    
You can compare Math.Round(TotalSeconds) or maybe Math.Truncate instead. –  Јοеу Feb 7 '13 at 16:38
    
@Sam1 see my answer for a complete solution to comparing rounded dates –  Matt Johnson Feb 7 '13 at 23:38
add comment

That should work, please check:

var now = DateTime.Now;
DateTime? d1 = now;
DateTime? d2 = now;

Console.WriteLine(d1 == d2); // Output: True

I assume that they are actually not exactly the same, i.e. they differ in milliseconds or ticks.

share|improve this answer
    
no the ticks are not the same.....but strange how they are different when they both come from same database field –  Zaki Feb 7 '13 at 14:58
    
can i ignore the ticks and compare date and time only –  Zaki Feb 7 '13 at 15:00
    
@Sam1 ticks are a part of the time. You can round the dates to the nearest second, or millisecond, or whatever you want as mentioned in other answers/comments. –  Servy Feb 7 '13 at 16:59
add comment

As the other answers have indicated, the default comparer will work just fine for nullable DateTime objects. You have asked in comments how to compare a rounded form of the dates. You would want something like:

if (dt1.EqualsRounded(dt2))

Below is all the code you will need to do this. It fully supports nullable and non-nullable DateTimes. It implements both IComparer<T> and IEqualityComparer<T> so you can also use this when sorting lists (for example). There are extension methods for the simple case like the one above, and there are overloads to provide a different rounding interval. Without specifying one, it defaults to round to the nearest whole second. Enjoy!

public static class DateTimeExtensions
{
    public static DateTime RoundToNearestInterval(this DateTime dateTime, TimeSpan interval)
    {
        // Adapted from http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1393696/c-rounding-datetime-objects

        // do the rounding
        var intervalTicks = interval.Ticks;
        var ticks = (dateTime.Ticks + (intervalTicks / 2) + 1) / intervalTicks;
        var totalTicks = ticks * intervalTicks;

        // make sure the result is not to low
        if (totalTicks < 0)
            totalTicks = 0;

        // make sure the result is not to high
        const long maxTicks = 0x2bca2875f4373fffL; // DateTime.MaxTicks
        if (totalTicks > maxTicks)
            totalTicks = maxTicks;

        // return the new date from the result
        return new DateTime(totalTicks, dateTime.Kind);
    }

    public static bool EqualsRounded(this DateTime x, DateTime y)
    {
        return x.EqualsRounded(y, TimeSpan.FromSeconds(1));
    }

    public static bool EqualsRounded(this DateTime x, DateTime y, TimeSpan interval)
    {
        var comparer = new RoundedDateTimeComparer(interval);
        return comparer.Equals(x, y);
    }

    public static bool EqualsRounded(this DateTime? x, DateTime? y)
    {
        return x.EqualsRounded(y, TimeSpan.FromSeconds(1));
    }

    public static bool EqualsRounded(this DateTime? x, DateTime? y, TimeSpan interval)
    {
        var comparer = new RoundedDateTimeComparer(interval);
        return comparer.Equals(x, y);
    }

    public static int CompareRounded(this DateTime x, DateTime y)
    {
        return x.CompareRounded(y, TimeSpan.FromSeconds(1));
    }

    public static int CompareRounded(this DateTime x, DateTime y, TimeSpan interval)
    {
        var comparer = new RoundedDateTimeComparer(interval);
        return comparer.Compare(x, y);
    }

    public static int CompareRounded(this DateTime? x, DateTime? y)
    {
        return x.CompareRounded(y, TimeSpan.FromSeconds(1));
    }

    public static int CompareRounded(this DateTime? x, DateTime? y, TimeSpan interval)
    {
        var comparer = new RoundedDateTimeComparer(interval);
        return comparer.Compare(x, y);
    }
}

public class RoundedDateTimeComparer : 
    IComparer<DateTime>, IComparer<DateTime?>,
    IEqualityComparer<DateTime>, IEqualityComparer<DateTime?>
{
    private readonly TimeSpan _interval;

    public RoundedDateTimeComparer(TimeSpan interval)
    {
        _interval = interval;
    }

    public int Compare(DateTime x, DateTime y)
    {
        var roundedX = x.RoundToNearestInterval(_interval);
        var roundedY = y.RoundToNearestInterval(_interval);
        return roundedX.CompareTo(roundedY);
    }

    public int Compare(DateTime? x, DateTime? y)
    {
        return x.HasValue && y.HasValue ? Compare(x.Value, y.Value) : (y.HasValue ? 1 : (x.HasValue ? -1 : 0));
    }

    public bool Equals(DateTime x, DateTime y)
    {
        var roundedX = x.RoundToNearestInterval(_interval);
        var roundedY = y.RoundToNearestInterval(_interval);
        return roundedX.Equals(roundedY);
    }

    public bool Equals(DateTime? x, DateTime? y)
    {
        return x.HasValue && y.HasValue ? Equals(x.Value, y.Value) : x.Equals(y);
    }

    public int GetHashCode(DateTime obj)
    {
        var rounded = obj.RoundToNearestInterval(_interval);
        return rounded.GetHashCode();
    }

    public int GetHashCode(DateTime? obj)
    {
        return obj.HasValue ? GetHashCode(obj.Value) : 0;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Can't you just check if they're null before you use .Compare?

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.