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At my company, we currently work with a DDD architecture, in combination with event sourcing and CQRS. In the initial version, we allowed every context to receive the events from any other context. This however quickly became a mess, because it became very hard to track which events were handled where.

Our current approach is to only allow commands to be send to other contexts. This works better, but it seems to generate a lot of code overhead. For example:

context A sends a  command to context B, 
which changes the state of a domain model, 
which publishes an event, 
which gets handled by an event handler, 
which sends a command back to context A, 
which changes the state of a domain model, 
which publishes an event, 
which gets handled by an event handler,
which sends a command to context C,
etcetera.

A lot of the domain models in different contexts, and a lot of the events which trigger a command sent to another context, contain a lot of similar data. Especially in our customer website context, the models contain almost no logic or state and are just used to generate events which can be denormalized to the website database. It works, but still this does not seem to be the way to go either since publishing events should not be the sole purpose of any domain model.

One of our ideas now was to make our CMS act like a domain model, and handle commands directly instead of sending them through a model and process the resulting events. Is this a proper way to handle cases such as these? And are there any other, more efficient ways to communicate between contexts?

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

In the initial version, we allowed every context to receive the events from any other context. This however quickly became a mess, because it became very hard to track which events were handled where.

I don't see a problem with this alone. Communication among BCs via events is a typical event-driven architecture. The tracking of events can be accomplished with a context map.

It seems however that in your case BC interactions were becoming overly chatty. This could be a symptom of sub-optimal boundaries. Perhaps the boundaries are too granular? Given that several domain models contain a lot of similar data may be an indication that those domains should be merged. The underlying principle of a BC is that of functional and linguistic cohesion - things that are closely related stick together.

A domain model changing state in response to a command followed by publishing an event is a completely valid workflow.

Especially in our customer website context, the models contain almost no logic or state and are just used to generate events which can be denormalized to the website database.

This seems to be like a view/projection in CQRS terms. Again, nothing wrong here.

One of our ideas now was to make our CMS act like a domain model, and handle commands directly instead of sending them through a model and process the resulting events.

This may be an important observation. A full fledged domain model makes sense where the business logic is complex. However, if the domain is that of a CMS or CRUD then there is not need for a domain model. However, you can still retain the rest of the event-driven architecture.

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