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I am developing a C++ class library for some computing-intensive tasks (machine vision).

// I am a part of a Qt-agnostic library
class Cruncher
{
    /* ... */
public:
    void doStuff();
};

Then there's a Qt GUI using that library. I'm creating a worker thread to call the heavy-lifting routines from the library:

// I am a part of a Qt-based GUI which utilizes the library
class Worker : public QThread
{
    /* ... */
protected:
    virtual void run()
    {
        /* ... */
        Cruncher c;
        for (int i = 0; i < count; ++i)
            c.doStuff(); // takes some time, and while it's working 
                         // it should communicate status changes which should
                         // become visible in the GUI
    }
};

Now inside doStuff() a lot happens and I want to provide some feedback to the user on what is going on without waiting for doStuff() to return. For one, maybe some finer progress reporting than just increasing the meter by one step after a each call to doStuff(). Also, doStuff() may encounter non-critical failures which let it continue a part of the work, but I'd like a message to appear in the GUI when this happens as Cruncher is working (and Worker is currently busy with a call to doStuff()).

I want the library to remain Qt-independent so I'm not willing to add signals and slots to Cruncher. Any other way to enable it to provide feedback to the GUI to report on its work when it's not a Qt class?

I was considering creating a QTimer which would poll some "status" and "errorMsg" members of Cruncher at fixed intervals while Worker is running, but this seems highly sub-optimal.

share|improve this question
    
You already have QThread there, so it's not very Qt-independent... –  hyde Feb 7 '13 at 15:12
    
The QThread is in the GUI, not in the library. I want the library (a separate project which can be used in other, non-interactive, non-GUI programs) to remain Qt independent. –  neuviemeporte Feb 7 '13 at 15:15

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I am posting my own answer because though I took @Nim's advice, I'd like the answer to be a little more verbose and hence more useful if someone should have the same problem.

I created the skeleton of a message dispatcher in the library:

// doesn't need to know about Qt
class MessagePort
{
public:
    virtual void message(std::string msg) = 0;
};

Next, I added a handle to this object to Cruncher and spiced doStuff() with occasional calls to message():

// now with Super Cow powers!
class Cruncher
{
protected:
    MessagePort *msgPort_;

public:
    Cruncher(MessagePort *msgPort) : msgPort_(msgPort) {}
    void doStuff()
    {
        while(...)
        {
            /*...*/
            msgPort_->message("Foo caused an overload in Bar!");
        }
    }
};

Finally, I crafted an implementation of MessagePort inside the GUI using all necessary Qt goodness:

class CruncherMsgCallback : public QObject, public MessagePort
{
    Q_OBJECT

public:
    CruncherMsgCallback() : QObject(), MessagePort()
    {
        connect(this, SIGNAL(messageSignal(const QString &)), 
                GUI,    SLOT(messageShow(const QString &)), 
                Qt::QueuedConnection);
    }

    virtual void message(std::string msg)
    {
        emit messageSignal(QString::fromStdString(msg));
    }

signals:
    void messageSignal(const QString &msg);
};

Finally when the Worker creates an instance of Cruncher, it also gives it a pointer to a working MessagePort:

class Worker
{
protected:
    virtual void run()
    {
        CruncherMsgCallback msgC;
        Cruncher c(&msgC); // &msgC works as a pointer to a 
                           // generic MessagePort by upcasting
        c.doStuff(); // Cruncher can send messages to the GUI 
                     // from inside doStuff()
    }
};
share|improve this answer
1  
+1, I do have a day job too.. :) If it does the job, and clearly separates the components, and the intent is clear, it's a good solution... –  Nim Feb 7 '13 at 22:57
    
@Nim: Thanks for the idea, had fun trying to figure it out on my own. :) –  neuviemeporte Feb 8 '13 at 0:07

Use a callback function (class) etc, and pass that in during construction. Things you need to report, report via that callback.

share|improve this answer
    
Okay, but should the callback be a part of the GUI, or the library? If it's the former, how do I avoid #including GUI prototypes inside the library? If it's the latter, how do I communicate with the GUI without knowing anything about it? Could you please provide a (pseudo-)code example? –  neuviemeporte Feb 7 '13 at 15:29

You can safely emit signals from the run() method, I think that's the best way to pass information from worker thread to the main thread. Just add the signals to your QThread subclass (avoid adding slots, if you're at all unsure how QThread threading works).

Better make the connections from these signals explicitly queued, to avoid problems. Though the default, automatic connection type should also work and do Queued signal emit, but I think it's better to be explicit in cases like this. Actually also direct signals should work as such, but then you have to take care of thread safety yourself instead of letting Qt handle it for you, and you can't connect to slots which use any of the QtGui classes which only work in the main thread, so it's better to stick to queued connections.

To pass simple information to the run() method, and if immediate reaction is not needed, maybe use a few shared QAtomicInt variables or something like that as flags, which the worker thread checks when convenient. Slightly more complex method, still requiring polling, is to have shared data structure which you protect with mutex. More complex way of communicating to that direction would involve some kind of message queue (just like Qt uses in the event loop of the main thread, when you emit signal to that direction).

share|improve this answer
    
Problem is, the run() method is stuck with a call to doStuff() and doesn't become free until the current call to doStuff() terminates. I need to send messages while doStuff() is running. –  neuviemeporte Feb 7 '13 at 15:26
    
@neuviemeporte well, how does the doStuff() get the messages? What inter-thread communication operations/funcionts/libraries are available there? Specify that in your question, maybe. –  hyde Feb 7 '13 at 15:29
    
doStuff() is the source of the messages; when it decides something is impossible, it skips over some of the work. The library that it's part of has access to all of libstc++, and any other library, just not Qt. Sorry for being unclear. –  neuviemeporte Feb 7 '13 at 15:34
    
I was just about to write something about callback interface class, but you wrote an answer doing just that so... Yeah :) –  hyde Feb 7 '13 at 20:15

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