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I've been banging my head trying to write a proper #define function-like macro but am getting stuck. Here's the example I'm working with:

#include <iostream>
#define pMAKE(x,y,z,dest)\
    (dest).(x) = (x);\
    (dest).(y) = (y);\
    (dest).(z) = (z);

struct pt {
    double x, y, z;
};

int main() {
    pt p;
    pMAKE(0,1,2,p);
    return 0;
}

And the errors I'm getting:

A.cpp: In function ‘int main()’:
A.cpp:13: error: expected unqualified-id before ‘(’ token
A.cpp:13: error: expected unqualified-id before ‘(’ token
A.cpp:13: error: expected unqualified-id before ‘(’ token

What do the errors mean and why am I getting them? I managed to get the following to work the way I wanted, but I honestly just got lucky and I seriously don't understand what's going on.

#define pMAKE(X,Y,Z,dest)\
    dest.x = (X);\
    dest.y = (Y);\
    dest.z = (Z);

I appreciate every bit of help!

share|improve this question
13  
Short answer : DON'T WRITE MACROS IN C++. –  Bartek Banachewicz Feb 7 '13 at 15:25
3  
Seriously. I'll answer the question (if nobody else is correct first), but why are you going this route? This is what a constructor is for. You don't even need a constructor since it's an aggregate. Just use brace initialization. –  Potatoswatter Feb 7 '13 at 15:27
    
I agree that macro's are a terrible idea. My only reason is that I working on pre-existing code that already has a bunch of these macros implemented for vector calculations (cross product, etc). Since the code's already in place I might as well use it. Unfortunately, it appears I'm having trouble calling these macros in the first place. –  Barney Feb 7 '13 at 15:30
    
No, don't use it. Use GLM. Use whatever, just don't use macros. It will be faster to refactor than to deal with this crap. –  Bartek Banachewicz Feb 7 '13 at 15:32
1  
@BarneyHsiao It's simple to replace function-like macros with inline functions. The macro can't do anything the function can't. This is not a painful band-aid to pull. –  Potatoswatter Feb 7 '13 at 15:32

6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

With the first version of your macro, pMAKE(0,1,2,p); expands to

p.0 = 0;
p.1 = 1;
p.2 = 2;;

In other words, you've pre-processed away references to the x, y, z members of pt by using x, y, z as both variable names (on the left of the assignments) and labels to be replaced by the pre-processor (on the right of the assignments).

(As noted by Konrad Rudolph) Your macro still has another serious error unfortunately. Consider code of the form

pt p;
if (foo)
    pMAKE(0,1,2,p);

which expands to

pt p;
if (foo)
    p.x = 0;
p.y = 1;  // happens regardless of 'foo' test
p.z = 2;; // happens regardless of 'foo' test

You can fix this (and get rid of that annoying extra semi-colon) by changing your macro to

#define pMAKE(X,Y,Z,dest)\
    do { \
        (dest).x = (X);\
        (dest).y = (Y);\
        (dest).z = (Z);\
    } while (0)
share|improve this answer
    
And this causes his error because? –  Jack Aidley Feb 7 '13 at 15:32
2  
@JackAidley Because p.(0) is nonsense. Undeserved downvote. –  StoryTeller Feb 7 '13 at 15:34
    
@JackAidley I thought showing how the macro expanded made this obvious. I've included additional explanation now. –  simonc Feb 7 '13 at 15:35
    
I will accept your answer. –  Barney Feb 7 '13 at 15:44
3  
“not a big deal” – actually kind of a big deal because of this: if (foo) pMAKE(1, 2, 3, p); –  Konrad Rudolph Feb 7 '13 at 15:48
struct pt {
    double x, y, z;
    pt(double _x, double _y, double _z) : x(_x), y(_y), z(_z) { }
};

pt p (0.0, 1.0, 2.0);

Don't use macros in C++.

Or, as @potatoswatter suggested, get it done right at once in C++11

struct pt { double x, y, z; };
pt p = { 0.0, 1.0, 2.0 };
share|improve this answer
    
The aggregate init part can already be done in C++98. –  Xeo Feb 7 '13 at 15:29
1  
You still need an = operator before C++11. Eh, I'll just edit it for you. –  Potatoswatter Feb 7 '13 at 16:50

What do the errors mean and why am I getting them?

The macro replaces all occurrences of its parameters with the arguments; so

(dest).(x) = (x)

becomes

(dest).(0) = (0)

which is nonsense. The compiler expects a member name (an identifier, referred to as an "unqualified-id" by the language syntax), but sees (0) instead.

In the second version, x isn't a parameter name, so dest.x is not changed.

A better approach would be to avoid macros; use a function:

pt make_pt(double x, double y, double z) {
    pt p;
    p.x = x; 
    p.y = y;
    p.z = z;
    return p;
}

int main() {
    pt p = make_pt(0,1,2);
}

or just use aggregate initialisation:

int main() {
    pt p = {0,1,2};
}

and, in C++11, assignment from an initialiser list:

p = {4,5,6};
share|improve this answer

Macros work as textual replacement. Everywhere a parameter of the macro appears in the replacement list, is is textually replaced by the argument. So in your case, pMAKE(0, 1, 2, p); expands to:

(p).(0) = (0);
(p).(1) = (1);
(p).(2) = (2);;

(Actually, it would be all on one line, since macros don't preserve newlines, but I put it on three lines for clarity).

In your case, you don't want a macro. You want an inline function (probably a member function or constructor of pt). Only use macros where you need their textual nature (such as combining tokens into identifiers etc.). For all else, use (inline) functions. Like this:

struct pt
{
  double x, y, z;
  pt(double ax, double ay, double az) : x(ax), y(ay), z(az) {}
};

int main()
{
  pt p(0, 1, 2);
}
share|improve this answer

Use an inline function,

pt& pMake(int x, int y, int z, pt&p){
    p.x=x;
    p.y=y;
    p.z=z;
    return p;
};
share|improve this answer
    
I believe that inline is the correct answer... but where exactly is inline in this code? EDIT: I now realize that inline is actually not the correct answer for initialization. –  Waleed Khan Feb 7 '13 at 15:35
    
That's still terrible design. –  Bartek Banachewicz Feb 7 '13 at 15:36
    
@WaleedKhan you seldom need to write inline. Compiler will know what to do with it better. –  Bartek Banachewicz Feb 7 '13 at 15:36
    
@Bartek Not sure what motivates this comment. In fact, you explicitly need to write inline quite often to respect ODR (in fact, you need to for every header-defined namespace-scope function unless you’re using an unnamed namespace). –  Konrad Rudolph Feb 7 '13 at 15:51
    
(1) Oops I forgot to put the inline word in. (2) The OP was not using a constructor, and I assumed that the class pt could not be added to because it is usually defined in a library. He defines it here but I thought that was just so that he could ask the question and show the structure. –  QuentinUK Feb 9 '13 at 22:38

The .(x) member access accidentally uses the name of the parameter x. (Also, the second operand of a member access isn't an expression, so the parentheses don't belong.) Best practice is to keep all macro names and macro parameters in all caps, to prevent naming collisions. And avoid single character identifiers, too.

#define POINT_MAKE(X,Y,Z,DEST)\
    (DEST).x = (X);\
    (DEST).y = (Y);\
    (DEST).z = (Z);
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