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Via Github I use the same set of "dot files" on several different computers and servers. On the Macs and Linux boxes under my direct control I have Sublime Text 2 installed and set up as my git merge and commit editor of choice. However, on remote (i.e., not under my direct control) servers I would select to use vim.

I would rather not create and maintain a second .gitconfig for those remote servers. Is there a way to do something like this:

[core]
    if [[ $IS_REMOTE -eq 1 ]]; then
        editor = "vim"
    else
        editor = "subl -n -w"
    fi

where I've somehow set $IS_REMOTE based on the hostname?

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Why not just use a script file as "editor" value in which you check that? (Because no, git config is not conditional) –  Nevik Rehnel Feb 7 '13 at 15:35
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3 Answers

No, Git config does not support checks or conditional statements. But your underlying shell probably does, so you can use something like:

[core]
    editor = "if [[ $IS_REMOTE -eq 1 ]]; then ED='vim'; else ED='subl -n -w'; fi; $ED"


If you need to do something more complicated than that, you could just throw the shell code into a script, of course, like

[core]
    editor = "my_edi_script.sh"

with my_edit_script.sh containing something like:

#!/bin/bash
if [[ $IS_REMOTE -eq 1 ]]; then
    ED="vim"
else
    ED="subl -n -w"
fi

$ED some argument or other

Edit: The my_edit_script.sh would have to be in the $PATH, of course :)

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In addition to the editor setting, the merge tool and diff tool settings will also change for the remote machines. I think the solution in the end is to have two .gitconfig files. –  Mark Nichols Feb 8 '13 at 4:40
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I don't think you can do this, but instead of maintaining your .gitconfig file, how about maintaining a script that generates your .gitconfig file? That way you can do whatever you want, based not only on variables but also on the output of commands and whatever...

like:

#!/bin/sh
if [ "$#" -eq 0 ]
then
    IS_REMOTE=
else
    case "$1" in
        remote)
            IS_REMOTE=1
            ;;
        local)
            IS_REMOTE=
            ;;
        *)
            echo "value $1 not supported" >&2
            ;;
    esac
fi

# config for both remote and local
git config --global color.ui true
git config --global alias.top '!pwd -L'

# config for remote
if [ "$IS_REMOTE" ]
then
    git config --global core.editor vim
    ...
else
    git config --global core.editor 'subl -n -w'
    ...
fi

So, if you call the script without parameters, or with the 'local' parameter, it will generate some configuration to your .gitconfig file, while if you pass the 'remote' parameter to it, it will generate some others.

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While I am attracted to the idea of using a scrip to generate the .gitconfig file, for as often as I'd have to make updates to two .gitconfig variations, I think it's more work that I am willing to put forth. –  Mark Nichols Feb 8 '13 at 4:39
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Since it isn't possible to test an environment variable and programmatically alter the .gitconfig, and since scripting the creation of two .gitconfig files feels like more work than I really want to put forth, I'm just going to create two .gitconfig files. On those machines where I can setup Sublime Text 2 as my editor, and have control over the merge tool and diff tool, I'll use the "primary" gitconfig as the target of my symbolic link. On those machines where I don't have ST2 as an option, I'll use the "secondary" gitconfig file.

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