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I have this code...

var suitcase = {
    shirt: "Hawaiian"
};

var checkProp = function(obj, prop, val){
if(obj.hasOwnProperty(prop)){
    console.log(obj.prop);
} else {
    obj.prop = val;
    console.log(obj.prop);
}
};
checkProp("suitcase","shorts","blue");

and when I run it, it returns undefined. On the surface it looks fine. No syntax problems or similar things like that. What would I have to do to get this to work?

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5 Answers 5

suitcase is a var, not a string. Instead, it should read

checkProp(suitcase,'shorts','blue');
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Pass the Object itself, not it's name:

checkProp(suitcase,"shorts","blue");

Also, use obj[prop] instead of obj.prop.
(With obj.prop, you're accessing the prop property of the object, literally, not the property you're looking for.)

Other than that, your code works. It could be shortened like this, though:

var checkProp = function(obj, prop, val){
    obj[prop] = obj[prop] || val; // If obj[prop] exists, set it to itself (does nothing), otherwise, set it's content to `val`.
    console.log(obj.prop);
};
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this would not work the way he has implemented it if prop was on obj prototype, he is checking for the prop on the object itself only. –  0xor1 Feb 7 '13 at 15:39

You have a few different options but I think your solution may work. It just has a small error. In your call to your function:

checkProp('suitcase', 'shorts', 'blue);

You have "suitcase" defined as a string when it should be an object. Try fixing that and see if it works.

Edit:

Another option you could try would be this:

var checkProp = function(obj, prop, val){
    if(obj) {
        if(!obj[prop]) {
            obj[prop] = val;
        }
        if(window.console && window.console.log) {
            console.log(obj[prop]);
        }
    }
};
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What browsers don't support console / console.log that you'd have to check for that? o.O That seems to be a bit out of scope for this question. –  Cerbrus Feb 7 '13 at 15:45
    
I like your function. It's a bit more concise. My function is rather long-winded. Plus, you have checks in your function for support of logging to the console, a very useful thing. –  Jonathan Feb 7 '13 at 15:48
    
@Cerbrus I've had trouble with IE 9. The debugger doesn't attach automatically and if I don't have the developer tools opened it was throwing an error. It's just an extra check. It is a little out of scope but I'd rather post an answer that will work in all browsers. It also could be my settings are a little different. Either way, its better to be safe than sorry. –  War10ck Feb 7 '13 at 16:01
    
@Jonathan Thanks. I didn't think your solution was long winded. It definitely made since and I imagine it worked quite nicely. I'm just so weary of console.log throwing an error (thanks IE 9) now that I usually wrap it just to be sure. Never a good thing to see red error text in the console. :P –  War10ck Feb 7 '13 at 16:05
var suitcase = {
    shirt: "Hawaiian"
};

var checkProp = function(obj, prop, val){
    if(obj.hasOwnProperty(prop)){
        console.log(obj[prop]);
    } else {
        obj[prop] = val;
        console.log(obj[prop]);
    }
};
checkProp(suitcase,"shorts","blue");
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What you want is probably obj[prop] instead of obj.prop

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