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I have defined a struct like this

Struct rectangle{

int x;
int y;
int z;

};

and then in my main method, i will be assigning the variables:

void main(int argc, const char *argv[])

{

   for(i=0;i<20;i++)

   {

     rectangle[i].x = 20;
     rectangle[i].y = 10;

    }

}

But I wont be assigning the 'z' variable of the struct anytime. Am i allowed to do this? hope i am not asking something very dumb!!

Thanks in advance!

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5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Yes, that's fine. Any attempt to use rectangle[i].z will result in undefined behaviour,* but that's not a problem so long as you don't try to use it.


* Unless rectangle is declared as a global/static array, in which case all its members are implicitly initialized to zero.

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The spec says reading an uninitialized object produces UB (4.1/1), but the spec also clearly says that z will be default initialized (8.5/11). Therefore I think the glvalue-prvalue conversion itself is not UB. So for example this should be well defined: if (std::numeric_limits<unsigned>::trap == false) { unsigned x; unsigned y = x + x; }. On the other hand doing the above with int could be UB, not because of 4.1/1, but because it might overflow, which causes UB for int. –  bames53 Feb 7 '13 at 16:59

You are allowed to do it. The member z will have an indeterminate value though.
So If you use it, without assigning any value to it you will end up with an Undefined Behavior(UB).

However, If the structure object is an global or static object then z will be implicitly initialized to 0 and you do not have to bother about UB.

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As said before, it won't harm. You can even print rectangle[i].z's value to see what was here before on the stack :).

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Like others have said, nothing bad will occur. But if you want to be on the safe side, provide a no-param constructor (it will be called by default for each object when the array of objects is created):

Struct rectangle{

  int x;
  int y;
  int z;

  rectangle() : x(0), y(0), z(0) {}

};

That way you know there is some sensible value there by default.

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In some applications initialization can have a significant cost, so initialization, while usually the right thing, isn't always desirable. –  bames53 Feb 7 '13 at 17:06
    
@bames53 True. Like I said, the "if" is up to the OP's judgement. I just wanted to mention the "how". –  StoryTeller Feb 7 '13 at 17:09

Yes you can get away without declaring z but the value for z will be undefined.

Think about using a default constructor for the struct and also defining rectangle z as a gloabal or static will initialize it to 0 so you don't have to worry about the value it will take on otherwise.

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