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I'm working on writing unit tests for a class that I'm developing. Another developer is developing other tests for the same class for methods that he's developing. So our tests find themselves in the same JUnit test class.

So what I wanted to do was to set up a test suite to run just my tests while I'm developing as a temporary measure. I created a Category for my tests and have marked them as such. I then created a class to be my test suite. I told it to include tests that belong to this category. When I run it, it still runs everything. There are a lot of tests, so it would be tedious to mark all the tests I don't want ran with @Ignore. Is there a way to say, run only the tests in a category but none else?

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How do you run the test? If you use maven surefire plugin there is a way to exclude or include some test based on metacharacter (*). –  Alepac Feb 7 '13 at 15:40
2  
You're both working on the same project, and you're each writing separate tests right? (good practice!) ... but you want to "only" run your tests - correct? –  pal Feb 7 '13 at 15:41
2  
Why not have two test classes? Or work in a branch where only your work is changing source? –  Dave Newton Feb 7 '13 at 15:42
    
Why not run either a single test or all the tests? After all, all tests under source control must either run or be ignored... –  Puce Feb 7 '13 at 15:46
1  
@JasonThompson I don't see what the issue is with two classes, plus a class with 40+ methods in it is unmanageable anyway. IMO the tests should be broken out by functionality into more communicative classes. –  Dave Newton Feb 7 '13 at 15:57

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You can write a wrapper test class which method calls the main test class (only your method), then run Junit tests on the wrapper class.

public class MainTestClass {
    @Test
    public void yourFirstTest() {
    ...
    }

    @Test
    public void yourSecondTest() {
    ...
    }

    @Test
    public void otherFirstTest() {
    ...
    }
}

public class WrapperTestClass {
    @Test
    public void yourFirstTest() {
       new MainTestClass().yourFirstTest();
    }

    @Test
    public void yourSecondTest() {
       new MainTestClass().yourSecondTest();
    }
}
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I think you can implement your own 'org.junit.runner.RunWith' and then annotate your test class to use it as necessary.

    @RunWith(MyRunnerClass.class)

Note: The correct solution here is in the above comments regarding code branches etc.

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