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I have received following oracle log:

DEADLOCK DETECTED ( ORA-00060 )

[Transaction Deadlock]

The following deadlock is not an ORACLE error. It is a
deadlock due to user error in the design of an application
or from issuing incorrect ad-hoc SQL. The following
information may aid in determining the deadlock:

Deadlock graph:
                       ---------Blocker(s)--------  ---------Waiter(s)---------
Resource Name          process session holds waits  process session holds waits
TX-00120007-0002acbf        82     185     X             67     240           X
TX-0008001c-0009ed94        67     240     X             82     185           X

session 185: DID 0001-0052-00000004 session 240: DID 0001-0043-00000004 
session 240: DID 0001-0043-00000004 session 185: DID 0001-0052-00000004 

Rows waited on:
  Session 185: obj - rowid = 0001285C - AAAShcAAiAAEoVFAAi
  (dictionary objn - 75868, file - 34, block - 1213765, slot - 34)
  Session 240: obj - rowid = 0001285C - AAAShcAAiAAEoRWAA3
  (dictionary objn - 75868, file - 34, block - 1213526, slot - 55)

----- Information for the OTHER waiting sessions -----
Session 240:
  sid: 240 ser: 7 audsid: 32762787 user: 76/NETCRACKER1
    flags: (0x8000041) USR/- flags_idl: (0x1) BSY/-/-/-/-/-
    flags2: (0x40008) -/-
  pid: 67 O/S info: user: oracle, term: UNKNOWN, ospid: 26869908
    image: oracle@opipodb1
  client details:
    O/S info: user: adipoas1, term: unknown, ospid: 1234
    machine: opipoas1 program: JDBC Thin Client
    application name: JDBC Thin Client, hash value=2546894660
  current SQL:
  select o.object_id
  from nc_objects o,
       (select object_id
          from nc_objects
        connect by prior object_id = parent_id
         start with object_id = :a1
        union
        select object_id
          from nc_references
         where reference in (select object_id
                               from nc_objects
                             connect by prior object_id = parent_id
                              start with object_id = :a1)) ids
 where o.object_id = ids.object_id
 order by o.object_id
   for update of o.object_id

----- End of information for the OTHER waiting sessions -----

Information for THIS session:

----- Current SQL Statement for this session (sql_id=3mxkkzhttwa2q) -----
select o.object_id
  from nc_objects o,
       (select object_id
          from nc_objects
        connect by prior object_id = parent_id
         start with object_id = :a1
        union
        select object_id
          from nc_references
         where reference in (select object_id
                               from nc_objects
                             connect by prior object_id = parent_id
                              start with object_id = :a1)) ids
 where o.object_id = ids.object_id
 order by o.object_id
   for update of o.object_id
===================================================

Is it means that two equal queries ( but may be with different data ) have locked each other ?

If it's so how can it happen ? - this query locks ordered sequence and i guess we cannot have deadlocks here.

DB is metamodel object_id - PK

Thanks

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

ORDER BY will not always prevent deadlocks.

Here's a possible scenario that leads to a deadlock with your query:

  1. Session 1 runs your query with :id=A
  2. Session 2 runs your query with :id=B
  3. Session 1 runs your query with :id=B, session 1 now waiting on session 2
  4. Session 2 runs your query with :id=A, deadlock issued

When you issue SELECT FOR UPDATE, you run the risk of waiting on another session. If this session is already waiting on you, there is a deadlock.

One common way to avoid deadlocks in OLTP environment is to only issue SELECT FOR UPDATE NOWAIT. Let the second session fail instead of waiting.


Update following comment

You have multiple sessions updating the same table. You have a chance that they block each other. If you let them wait and they update more than one row, you have a chance for a deadlock. You have many options to manage this:

  1. Let the sessions deadlock. Oracle will detect this automatically and rollbacks one. Oracle will only rollback the last statement of one of the session, not the whole transaction, this means that the session that gets the error should rollback first, then retry later.

  2. Run them with NOWAIT as I advised.
    If you don't want to let them fail, you could:

    1. lock row with NOWAIT
    2. if ORA-56 rollback
    3. retry from the beginning of the transaction after sleep (X seconds).

    You need to rollback to make sure that two sessions can not block each other indefinetely.

  3. serialize the updates. This is usually done by making sure that only a single session can update the table (or a range of rows) at the same time.
    For example, you could let all sessions INSERT in a transaction table and let a single job merge the modification into the final table. The concurrent sessions couldn't block each others. This would obviously defer the update to the main table (after commit at least).

I would not advise option 1 since you have no control over deadlock detection (and thus you can't optimize it).

share|improve this answer
    
I can't leave any session as failed. I need to apply changes. So what I need to do ? Run query with NOWAIT specified and if exception occurs - run it again and again ( in loop I mean ) ? –  user1320115 Feb 8 '13 at 10:04
    
Dealing with concurrent updates is something that you have to think about, I've outlined 3 options in my post. –  Vincent Malgrat Feb 8 '13 at 10:48
    
Additionally, if you commit after each SELECT FOR UPDATE and if you don't lock any other table/rows, it seems highly unlikely that you will run into deadlocks. –  Vincent Malgrat Feb 8 '13 at 10:56

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