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Suppose I have the following two arrays:

a = array([(1, 'L', 74.423088306605), (5, 'H', 128.05441039929008),
       (2, 'L', 68.0581377353869), (0, 'H', 88.15726964130869), 
       (4, 'L', 97.4501582588212), (3, 'H', 92.98550136344437),
       (7, 'L', 87.75945631669309), (6, 'L', 90.43196739694255),
       (8, 'H', 111.13662092749307), (15, 'H', 91.44444608631304),
       (10, 'L', 85.43615908319185), (11, 'L', 78.11685661303494),
       (13, 'H', 108.2841293816308), (17, 'L', 74.43917911042259),
       (14, 'H', 64.41057325770373), (9, 'L', 27.407214746467943),
       (16, 'H', 81.50506434964355), (12, 'H', 97.79700070323196),
       (19, 'L', 51.139258140713025), (18, 'H', 118.34835768605957)], 
      dtype=[('id', '<i4'), ('name', 'S1'), ('value', '<f8')])

b = array([ 0,  3,  5,  8, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 18], dtype=int32)

I want to select elements from a for which the id is given in b. That is, b is not an index array. It contains the ids of the observations. How can I do this in numpy?

Thanks for the help.

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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

you should get what you want with this

indeces = [i for i,id in enumerate(a['id']) if id in b]
suba = a[indeces]
print(suba)
>>>array([(5, 'H', 128.05441039929008), (0, 'H', 88.15726964130869),
   (3, 'H', 92.98550136344437), (8, 'H', 111.13662092749307),
   (15, 'H', 91.44444608631304), (13, 'H', 108.2841293816308),
   (14, 'H', 64.41057325770373), (16, 'H', 81.50506434964355),
   (12, 'H', 97.79700070323196), (18, 'H', 118.34835768605957)], 
  dtype=[('id', '<i4'), ('name', '|S1'), ('value', '<f8')])
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Thanks! This seems good. If I do not see a better answer in sometime, I will accept this one. –  Curious2learn Feb 7 '13 at 16:21
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The following works several times faster than Francesco's approach for your sample array:

In [7]: a[np.argmax(a['id'][None, :] == b[:, None], axis=1)]
Out[7]: 
array([(0, 'H', 88.15726964130869), (3, 'H', 92.98550136344437),
       (5, 'H', 128.05441039929008), (8, 'H', 111.13662092749307),
       (12, 'H', 97.79700070323196), (13, 'H', 108.2841293816308),
       (14, 'H', 64.41057325770373), (15, 'H', 91.44444608631304),
       (16, 'H', 81.50506434964355), (18, 'H', 118.34835768605957)], 
      dtype=[('id', '<i4'), ('name', '|S1'), ('value', '<f8')])

In [8]: %timeit a[np.argmax(a['id'][None, :] == b[:, None], axis=1)]
100000 loops, best of 3: 11.6 us per loop

In [9]: %timeit indices = [i for i,id in enumerate(a['id']) if id in b]; a[indices]
10000 loops, best of 3: 66.9 us per loop

To understand how it works, take a look at this:

In [10]: a['id'][None, :] == b[:, None]
Out[10]: 
array([[False, False, False,  True, False, False, False, False, False,
        False, False, False, False, False, False, False, False, False,
        False, False],
    ... # several rows removed 
    [False, False, False, False, False, False, False, False, False,
        False, False, False, False, False, False, False, False, False,
        False,  True]], dtype=bool)

It is an array of as many rows as elements in b and as many columns as elements in a. np.argmax then finds the position of the first True in every row, which is the index of the first appearance of the corresponding element of b in a['id'].

As shown above, for small arrays this beats python performance-wise. But if either a or b get too big, then the size of the intermediate array of bools can cripple performance. Also, np.argmax has to search the full row, it never breaks out of the loop early, which is not a good thing if a is too long. I did some timings in an answer to this question that uses a similar approach, and there it was still the way to go for moderately large arrays.

Francesco's approach is definitely less hacky, easier to understand, and for an array the size of your sample the performance differences are irrelevant, I must admit. But it doesn't make you feel as much like this...

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wow that's amazing, although I can't say that I understand the logic behind the [None,:]. Just a curiosity: do you have any idea of the scaling of your approach? Naively I would say that mine scales roughly linearly with the size of a and b (if the if id in b is lazy the scaling is even better) –  Francesco Montesano Feb 7 '13 at 20:07
    
@FrancescoMontesano That's exactly the issue, I think this is O(n**2), yours I'd say is better, although according to this you may have to convert b into a set for that to be true. So eventually your approach will be the fastest, but for a very large range of the smaller sizes, the slowness of python, or the speed of numpy/C is too much for it to matter. –  Jaime Feb 7 '13 at 20:27
    
@FrancescoMontesano [None, :] is equivalent to .reshape(1, -1), it turns a 1D array into a column vector. So when it compares a column and a row vector, it broadcasts them to the full rectangular shape. –  Jaime Feb 7 '13 at 20:29
    
gotcha! I (think that I) didn't know about this broadcasting. Thank for the explanation –  Francesco Montesano Feb 8 '13 at 6:31
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sorted = numpy.sort(a)
sorted[b]
 array([(0, 'H', 88.15726964130869), (3, 'H', 92.98550136344437),
   (5, 'H', 128.05441039929008), (8, 'H', 111.13662092749307),
   (12, 'H', 97.79700070323196), (13, 'H', 108.2841293816308),
   (14, 'H', 64.41057325770373), (15, 'H', 91.44444608631304),
   (16, 'H', 81.50506434964355), (18, 'H', 118.34835768605957)], 
  dtype=[('id', '<i4'), ('name', '|S1'), ('value', '<f8')])

As long there are as many ids as rows in the array.

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I don't want to rely on sort. I want it to be robust to the ordering. –  Curious2learn Feb 7 '13 at 16:23
    
I believe the first line should be sorted=numpy.argsort(a) in which case it will be robust to the ordering. –  DanB Feb 7 '13 at 17:16
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