Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I just made tried to do git checkout master and I got this error:

macoss-MacBook-Pro-10:Marketing owner12$ git checkout master
error: The following untracked working tree files would be overwritten by checkout:
    Marketing.xcodeproj/project.xcworkspace/xcuserdata/owner12.xcuserdatad/UserInterfaceState.xcuserstate
Please move or remove them before you can switch branches.
Aborting

but I am not sure how to handle this situation. I don't mind having this file overwritten by what is in the repo. What is the correct way for me to proceed here?

Thanks!

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You have files that are not being tracked. Either

rm untracked.file1 untracked.file2

or

git add . && git commit -m "adding new previously untracked files that serve a purpose"

if you're having permission issues:

git add --ignore-errors .

share|improve this answer
    
thank you. It almost worked. I am on the branch I need now, but for some reason when I tried to commit one of the files, I got a permission denied - would you know why that would happen? –  Genadinik Feb 7 '13 at 17:27
    
have you tried git add --ignore-errors . ? –  AdamT Feb 7 '13 at 17:29
add comment

Either delete the file if you don't care about it or stash it if you think you will need it in the future. Or simply rename.

share|improve this answer
    
thank you. It almost worked. I am on the branch I need now, but for some reason when I tried to commit one of the files, I got a permission denied - would you know why that would happen? –  Genadinik Feb 7 '13 at 17:27
add comment

Commit the files you want to keep and then do a git clean to remove the extra files you don't want to keep. This article on the git ready website describes it very well.

If you just want to get rid of one or two files in your working directory then you can do a dry run first and see which files would be cleaned up using:

git clean -n

And then when you are sure do this:

git clean -f

git clean has a -d switch if you want to clean up directories as well. And you can use that together with the other switches, so this is what I would normally use (and then after the dry run change -n to -f):

git clean -n -d

Then after your git clean, use:

git status

to make sure that you have no untracked files or uncommitted changes. And lastly switch to master with:

git checkout master
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.