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Well, I have problems in using semicolon (single and double) and nested if else in OCaml.

For example


let union u p q = 
  let rec unionfy id_ary i =
    if i < Array.length id_ary then begin 
      if id_ary.(i) = p then begin 
        id_ary.(i) <- id_ary.(q);
        print_array id_ary 0;
      end
      unionfy id_ary (i + 1);
    end 
    else print_string "end of union";
  in
  unionfy u.id_ary 0;;

The compiler said line 18, characters 29-95: Error: This expression is not a function; it cannot be applied

The line which has problem is if id_ary.(i) = p then begin, but I don't see why.


Also, can anyone tell me more about semicolon thing and nested if else?

here are some questions in my mind:

  1. When do I use single semicolon? If I use it for more than one expressions, will I have to add a double semicolon after the last expression?
  2. Can I use multiple begin end inside nested if?

  3. It seems I don't need to add else if the result is unit and do nothing?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The problem is end. The entire if expression should return unit in this case, so you need a semi-colon at the end of the expression. The other end doesn't need it since the if expression is continuing with the else clause. Below, I've removed the unnecessary semi-colons and added the remaining one,

let union u p q = 
  let rec unionfy id_ary i =
    if i < Array.length id_ary then begin 
      if id_ary.(i) = p then begin 
        id_ary.(i) <- id_ary.(q);
        print_array id_ary 0
      end;
      unionfy id_ary (i + 1)
    end 
    else print_string "end of union"
  in
  unionfy u.id_ary 0;;

EDIT: The 'rule' is really the definition of the semi-colon in OCaml. It separates sequential expressions that return unit. The content between begin ... end is a singular expression. The entire if expression is also an expression, but made up of multiple expressions. So the two statements contained in the first if statement are,

  if id_ary.(i) = p then begin ... end;
  unionfy id_ary (i + 1)
share|improve this answer
    
Why we don't need the ; behind 'print_array id_ary 0`, but we need one for unionfy id_ary (i + 1);? –  Jackson Tale Feb 7 '13 at 17:36
    
Could you please extend your answer to describe the general rule of all those? –  Jackson Tale Feb 7 '13 at 17:37
1  
Ok, roughly I understand now. ; is used only when you want to adjacent more than one expressions. In your code or mine, the most inside if begin end is actually an expression and together with unionfy id_ary (i+1), they are two adjacent expressions which reside inside the first if begin end.Am I right? –  Jackson Tale Feb 7 '13 at 17:39
1  
because the print_array is returning unit and the expression between begin ... end should have type unit. The semi-colon is syntactical sugar for let () = ... in. So the ; is necessary to separate the if expression and the unionfy expression. –  nlucaroni Feb 7 '13 at 17:40
    
Yes, you are correct! –  nlucaroni Feb 7 '13 at 18:00

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