Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
class someclass {};

class base
{
    int a;
    int *pint;
    someclass objsomeclass;
    someclass* psomeclass;
public:
    base()
    {
        objsomeclass = someclass();
        psomeclass = new someclass();
        pint = new int(); 
        throw "constructor failed";
        a = 43;
    }
}

int main()
{
    base temp();
}

In the above code, the constructor throws. Which objects will be leaked, and how can the memory leaks be avoided?

int main()
{
    base *temp = new base();
}

How about in the above code? How can the memory leaks be avoided after the constructor throws?

share|improve this question
1  
I know, I have an awful nature, that I can't resist to nitpick. I can't help it. My 2 cents: statement objsomeclass = someclass(); is unnecessary. In the body of the constructor objsomeclass is already default-initialized. objsomeclass( someclass()) below doesn't make sense either. –  Maciej Hehl Sep 29 '08 at 8:36
    
I agree ,but think that someclass has a explicit constructor.And i wanted to focus on object is created in constructor –  yesraaj Sep 29 '08 at 9:21
    
Yes, I know it's just an example. That's why I called it nitpicking. BTW constructor base() could be public :) –  Maciej Hehl Sep 29 '08 at 10:34
    
I have added it :-) –  yesraaj Sep 29 '08 at 11:20
add comment

7 Answers

up vote 29 down vote accepted

Yes it will leak memory. When the constructor throws, no destructor will be called (in this case you don't show a destructor that frees the dynamically allocated objects, but lets assume you had one).

This is a major reason to use smart pointers - since the smart poitners are full fledged objects, they will get destructors called during the exception's stack unwind and have the opportunity to free the memory.

If you use something like Boost's scoped_ptr<> template, your class could look more like:

class base{
    int a;
    scoped_ptr<int> pint;
    someclass objsomeclass;
    scoped_ptr<someclass> psomeclass;
    base() : 
       pint( new int),
       objsomeclass( someclass()),
       psomeclass( new someclass())

    {
        throw "constructor failed";
        a = 43;
    }
}

And you would have no memory leaks (and the default dtor would also clean up the dynamic memory allocations).


To sum up (and hopefully this also answers the question about the

base* temp = new base();

statement):

When an exception is thrown inside a constructor there are several things that you should take note of in terms of properly handling resource allocations that may have occured in the aborted construction of the object:

  1. the destructor for the object being constructed will not be called.
  2. destructors for member objects contained in that object's class will be called
  3. the memory for the object that was being constructed will be freed.

This means that if your object owns resources, you have 2 methods available to clean up those resources that might have already been acquired when the constructor throws:

  1. catch the exception, release the resources, then rethrow. This can be difficult to get correct and can become a maintenance problem.
  2. use objects to manage the resource lifetimes (RAII) and use those objects as the members. When the constructor for your object throws an exception, the member objects will have desctructors called and will have an opportunity to free the resource whose lifetimes they are responsible for.
share|improve this answer
    
Isn't hauling in Boost just go get memory management pretty silly? –  John Millikin Sep 29 '08 at 5:43
    
Maybe, but scoped_ptr is in TR1 and will be in C++09, so it's something that should be learned anyway. And the part of Boost that has scoped_ptr is just a bunch of headers. Finally, you could use auto_ptr instead for this simple example, but auto_ptr is probably something that should be avoided. –  Michael Burr Sep 29 '08 at 5:48
    
will the dtor of base class will be called even if i have once? what will happen to below line base *temp = new base(); –  yesraaj Sep 29 '08 at 5:54
    
Nothing will happen to the "base* temp = new base;" line - the exception will cause the memory for the attempted new base object allocation to be freed (even thought the dtor will not be called). –  Michael Burr Sep 29 '08 at 5:57
    
then y should one care to release the memory of individual member? –  yesraaj Sep 29 '08 at 6:05
show 2 more comments

Both new's will be leaked.

Assign the address of the heap created objects to named smart pointers so that it will be deleted inside the smart pointers destructor that get call when the exception is thrown - (RAII).

class base {
    int a;
    boost::shared_ptr<int> pint;
    someclass objsomeclass;
    boost::shared_ptr<someclass> psomeclass;

    base() :
        objsomeclass( someclass() ),
        boost::shared_ptr<someclass> psomeclass( new someclass() ),
        boost::shared_ptr<int> pint( new int() )
    {
        throw "constructor failed";
        a = 43;
    }
};

Now psomeclass & pint destructors will be called when the stack unwind when the exception is thrown in the constructor, and those destructors will deallocate the allocated memory.

int main(){
    base *temp = new base();
}

For ordinary memory allocation using (non-plcaement) new, memory allocated by the operator new is freed automatically if the constructor throws an exception. In terms of why bother freeing individual members (in response to comments to Mike B's answer), the automatic freeing only applies when an exception is thrown in a constructor of an object being new'ly allocated, not in other cases. Also, the memory that is freed is those allocated for the object members, not any memory you might have allocated say inside the constructor. i.e. It would free the memory for the member variables a, pint, objsomeclass, and psomeclass, but not the memory allocated from new someclass() and new int().

share|improve this answer
    
shared_ptr<> is overkill if you own the object and are never going to give shared ownership up. Simplify with std::auto_ptr<> –  Loki Astari Sep 29 '08 at 5:35
    
//Changed the question to have base *temp = new base(); –  yesraaj Sep 29 '08 at 5:36
    
And boost::scoped_ptr<> might be even better than auto_ptr<> which has it's own can of worms. –  Michael Burr Sep 29 '08 at 5:44
    
It was a (sorta) random pick in terms of smart pointers as examples. It's general enough that one doesn't have to worry about explaining when it shouldn't be used in quick examples like this. But yes, if a simpler smart pointers can be used, then do. –  KTC Sep 29 '08 at 7:09
add comment

I believe that the top answer is wrong and would still leak memory. The destructor for the class members will not be called if the constructor throws an exception (because it never completed its initialization, and perhaps some members have never reached their constructor calls). Their destructors are only called during the class's destructor call. That only makes sense.

This simple program demonstrates it.

#include <stdio.h>


class A
{
    int x;

public:
    A(int x) : x(x) { printf("A constructor [%d]\n", x); }
    ~A() { printf("A destructor [%d]\n", x); }
};


class B
{
    A a1;
    A a2;

public:
    B()
    :   a1(3),
        a2(5)
    {
        printf("B constructor\n");
        throw "failed";
    }
    ~B() { printf("B destructor\n"); }
};


int main()
{
    B b;

    return 0;
}

With the following output (using g++ 4.5.2):

A constructor [3]
A constructor [5]
B constructor
terminate called after throwing an instance of 'char const*'
Aborted

If your constructor fails partway then it is your responsibility to deal with it. Worse, the exception may be thrown from your base class' constructor! The way to deal with these cases is by employing a "function try block" (but even then you must carefully code the destruction of your partially initialized object).

The correct approach to your problem would then be something like this:

#include <stdio.h>


class A
{
    int x;

public:
    A(int x) : x(x) { printf("A constructor [%d]\n", x); }
    ~A() { printf("A destructor [%d]\n", x); }
};


class B
{
    A * a1;
    A * a2;

public:
    B()
    try  // <--- Notice this change
    :   a1(NULL),
        a2(NULL)
    {
        printf("B constructor\n");
        a1 = new A(3);
        throw "fail";
        a2 = new A(5);
    }
    catch ( ... ) {   // <--- Notice this change
        printf("B Cleanup\n");
        delete a2;  // It's ok if it's NULL.
        delete a1;  // It's ok if it's NULL.
    }

    ~B() { printf("B destructor\n"); }
};


int main()
{
    B b;

    return 0;
}

If you run it you will get the expected output where only the allocated objects are destroyed and freed.

B constructor
A constructor [3]
B Cleanup
A destructor [3]
terminate called after throwing an instance of 'char const*'
Aborted

You can still work it out with smart shared pointers if you want to, with additional copying. Writing a constructor similar to this:

class C
{
    std::shared_ptr<someclass> a1;
    std::shared_ptr<someclass> a2;

public:
    C()
    {
        std::shared_ptr<someclass> new_a1(new someclass());
        std::shared_ptr<someclass> new_a2(new someclass());

        // You will reach here only if both allocations succeeded. Exception will free them both since they were allocated as automatic variables on the stack.
        a1 = new_a1;
        a2 = new_a2;
    }
}

Good luck, Tzvi.

share|improve this answer
    
The exception in your first example is not caught, so stack unwinding does not occur and no destructors are called. If you wrap B b; in a try catch then the destructors are called as expected. –  M. Dudley Feb 5 '13 at 16:19
add comment

If you throw in a constructor, you should clean up everything that came before the call to throw. If you are using inheritance or throwing in a destructor, you really shouldn't be. The behaviour is odd (don't have my standard handy, but it might be undefined?).

share|improve this answer
    
Not sure if it's actually undefined, but is certainly very dangerous because destructors are called during stack unwinding on the event of a raised exception. If you raise an exception while another has been raised, every C++ runtime I know will terminate the application. –  John Millikin Sep 29 '08 at 5:08
    
An uncaught exception in a destructor raised during exception handling causes std::terminate() to be called, which by default call std::abort(). The default behaviour can be over-ridden. –  KTC Sep 29 '08 at 5:16
    
even though the default behavior can be overridden, your version still can't return back to the application, it still has to exit. –  Greg Rogers Sep 29 '08 at 5:43
add comment

Yes, that code will leak memory. Blocks of memory allocated using "new" are not freed when an exception is raised. This is part of the motivation behind RAII.

To avoid the memory leak, try something like this:

psomeclass = NULL;
pint = NULL;
/* So on for any pointers you allocate */

try {
    objsomeclass = someclass();
    psomeclass = new someclass();
    pint = new int(); 
    throw "constructor failed";
    a = 43;
 }
 catch (...)
 {
     delete psomeclass;
     delete pint;
     throw;
 }


share|improve this answer
    
rather than using pointers using object(smart pointer) will make things better?Since when ever an exception is thrown in a block automatic objects are cleared. –  yesraaj Sep 29 '08 at 5:18
    
smart pointers are better. Also replace 'raise'; with 'throw;' To rethrow the current exception. –  Loki Astari Sep 29 '08 at 5:33
add comment

Everything you "new" needs to be deleted, or you'll cause a memory leak. So these two lines:

psomeclass = new someclass();
pint = new int();

Will cause memory leaks, because you need to do:

delete pint;
delete psomeclass;

In a finally block to avoid them being leaked.

Also, this line:

base temp = base();

Is unnecessary. You just need to do:

base temp;

Adding the "= base()" is unnecessary.

share|improve this answer
1  
No such thing as a "finally" block in C++ –  John Millikin Sep 29 '08 at 5:00
    
True, you may or may not have access to it depending on your C++ flavour - if not, you'll have to make sure the allocations get deleted regardless of the code path taken. –  Colen Sep 29 '08 at 5:02
1  
Your remark about the extra initialization is wrong. The resulting object will only be initialized once, and will not be copied. –  John Millikin Sep 29 '08 at 5:06
add comment

you need to delete psomeclass... Its not necessary to clean up the integer...

RWendi

share|improve this answer
    
Can you please elaborate Dave Moore? Is it about the "not necessary to clean up the integer" part? The reason behind this is that Int memory pointer doesn't cost much in comparison to class memory pointer, that's why I said its not necessary to clean it. –  RWendi Sep 30 '08 at 0:30
    
They both leak; cost isn't an issue. The question was whether it leaked or not. And if that chunk of code executes thousands or millions of times, that little cost adds up. Even if "cost" were relevant, it's not the pointer's size that makes a difference, but rather the size of the pointed-to entity. For example, it's possible for sizeof(someclass) == sizeof(int). And you're not deleting the pointer--you're deleting the pointed-to entity. –  Chris Cleeland Nov 6 '09 at 17:53
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.