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I'm trying to collect data which is being parsed via a socket. Here is my code:

import pickle
import SocketServer

class SocketReciever(SocketServer.BaseRequestHandler):

    def handle(self):
        sint = self.request.makefile('rb')
        objectt = pickle.load(sint)
        #print(objectt)
        ParentClassCall(objectt)

if __name__ == "__main__":
    HOST, PORT = "localhost", 60

    # Create the server, binding to localhost on port 9999
    server = SocketServer.TCPServer((HOST, PORT), SocketReciever)
    # Activate the server; this will keep running until you
    # interrupt the program with Ctrl-C
    server.serve_forever()

data=[]
def ParentClassCall(currentdata):
    data.append(currentdata)

My question is how would I call the ParentClassCall function from within the SocketReciever class?

I know this method is plagued with security problems but it will be run on a computer without internet access.

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2  
I'm not sure what this has to do with inheritance. You call ParentClassCall as you would any function, as ParentClassCall(whateverdata). And it is called in that code (ParentClassCall(objectt)). –  David Robinson Feb 7 '13 at 17:46
    
Hi David, when ParentClassCall is called within the socket reciever. I get this message: NameError: global name 'ParentClassCall' is not defined. Which is expected as ParentClassCall is above the SocketReciever class in the hierarchy. I wondering how it could be done. –  Jonathan Kelsey Feb 7 '13 at 17:55
    
That doesn't have anything to do with a hierarchy or inheritance. In this example, ParentClassCall isn't a class or even a method of a class, it's just a regular function. –  David Robinson Feb 7 '13 at 18:08
    
Ok then, as I said, I am a noob. What I was thinking before was all the code belongs to a file which can be imported as an object hence its sort of an instance of a class, with the ParentClassCall being a function of that 'class'. Either way this does not tell me how I could achieve what I asked. –  Jonathan Kelsey Feb 7 '13 at 18:14
    
I've changed the name of the question as it not as you say relevant. –  Jonathan Kelsey Feb 7 '13 at 18:19
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Python never gets to defining ParentClassCall() since it stops at the line server.serve_forever(). Define the function before the main stanza.

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You are of course correct. Hero! Thanks very much :D –  Jonathan Kelsey Feb 7 '13 at 18:34
    
Darn. This came in while I was composing mine. Hopefully, the examples I gave add some clarity. –  John Hazen Feb 7 '13 at 18:37
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Here's a simplified version of your example, to demonstrate the problem:

class Foo(object):

  def __init__(self):
    pass

  def do_something(self):
    not_yet_defined_function()

if __name__ == "__main__":
  foo = Foo()
  foo.do_something()

def not_yet_defined_function():
  print "It worked!"

The result is the same:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "tmp.py", line 11, in <module>
    foo.do_something()
  File "tmp.py", line 7, in do_something
    not_yet_defined_function()

The problem is that you are trying to access the function before it's defined. The python interpreter reads through the file sequentially, executing commands in order. The class and def keywords are just commands that create (class and function) objects. So, you need to make sure you define all your objects before you start using them.

By changing the example to define the function first:

class Foo(object):

  def __init__(self):
    pass

  def do_something(self):
    not_yet_defined_function()

def not_yet_defined_function():
  print "It worked!"

if __name__ == "__main__":
  foo = Foo()
  foo.do_something()

Then you get the result you want:

lap:~$ python tmp2.py
It worked!
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Thanks for the clear explanation! I would mod your answer as useful but I'm too new apparently. –  Jonathan Kelsey Feb 7 '13 at 18:45
    
I will do it retrospectively some time :D –  Jonathan Kelsey Feb 7 '13 at 18:47
    
No problem. Welcome to Stack Overflow. –  John Hazen Feb 7 '13 at 19:08
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