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I am working with a has_many through for the first time, and despite a lot of reading here and in the guide I am not understanding the correct way to access attributes on the through table. My tables are the same as this example from another post.

    class Product < ActiveRecord::Base
       has_many :collaborators
       has_many :users, :through => :collaborators
    end

    class User < ActiveRecord::Base
       has_many :collaborators
       has_many :products, :through => :collaborators
   end

   class Collaborator < ActiveRecord::Base
      belongs_to :product
      belongs_to :user
   end

Assuming that the collaborators table has additional attributes, say hours_spent, what is the correct way to find the hours_spent from the collaborator table for a particular user and product?

When I have found my users via the product, and am iterating over them as in

    @product.users.each do |user| 

This seems to work

    user.collaborator[0].hours_spent

I get the correct value, but since there should only be one collaborator record for each User/Product pair, the index is throwing me off, making me think I’m doing something wrong.

Thank you for reading!

EDIT

Perhaps I am not getting the has_many through concept. Maybe a MySQL example would help.

What I was thinking is that if I did

    SELECT * FROM collaborators where user_id = 1;

I would expect a set (zero or more) as the result. Similarly

    SELECT * FROM collaborators where product_id = 1;

would also give me a set, but

    SELECT * FROM collaborators where user_id = 1 and product_id = 1;

would give at most 1 row.

If I am understanding properly, all 3 queries return a set. So I guess I need some kind of uniqueness constraint, but that would have to be a compound key of sorts, on both of the belongs to keys. Is that even possible? Is there a structure that better models this?

Thanks so much for the quick and helpful responses!

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3  
See has_one instead of has_many. –  meagar Feb 7 '13 at 18:12

4 Answers 4

Two things are important here. You have to add the attribute to attr_accessible in your joined model and and accepts_nested_attributes to the model from where you want to access the extra attribute.

class Product < ActiveRecord::Base
   has_many :collaborators
   has_many :users, :through => :collaborators
end

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
   attr_accessible :first_name, :last_name, :email, :collaborators_attributes
   has_many :collaborators
   has_many :products, :through => :collaborators
   accepts_nested_attributes_for :collaborators
end

class Collaborator < ActiveRecord::Base
  attr_accessible :product_id, :user_id, :hours_spent #<== your extra attribute
  belongs_to :product
  belongs_to :user
end

In the Collaborator model your new attribute is made accessible, that's the first step. Next you want to access that attribute through an other model, for example User. We do this by adding accepts_nested_attributes_for :collaborators and attr_accessible :collaborator_attributes. This gives us access to the extra attributes from Collaborator, in this case hours_spent. Using fields_for :collaborators you could even nest this within your user form.

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Ah, I did not have the attr_accessible or the accepts_nested_attributes_for. I added them, and –  Questor Feb 7 '13 at 20:06
    
Sorry about that, didn't mean to post the above as is. Thanks you for this, I was missing and have added but am still unclear on how to get the Collaborator attributes. I think maybe I'm missing some understanding. Since I have users that joined to product already, is there an implicit way of specifying hours_spent would refer to a particular collaboration? If not, I'm not getting how to specify that. I want to get the hours_spent for this user on that product, if that makes sense. Not all hours spent by a user or on a product. –  Questor Feb 7 '13 at 21:15
1  
Good point about mass assignment security (attr_accessible), but accepts_nested_attributes_for :collaborators and :collaborators_attributes in attr_accessible is only needed if you are trying to persist collaborators in update/create, not for accessing. To access, you just need to be sure that the attr_accessible for the attributes you want to expose are set on Collaborator. –  Gary S. Weaver Feb 7 '13 at 22:24

There may be a single database row per pair, but when considering a single user, that user can be associated to many products, so a user can have many rows in the collaborators table. Similarly, when considering a single product, that product can be associated to many users, so a product can have many rows in the collaborators table.

Also, instead of using user.collaborators[0].hours_spent, use user.collaborators.first.try(:hours_spent) (which may return null), if you only want the first collaborator's hours spent.

If a single user can only have one single product and a single product can only have a single user, then switch the has_many's to has_one's for everything.

Update: The preceding is the answer to the original question which has since been clarified via comments. See comments for detail and see comments on other answer by Peter.

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Users can have many products, and products can have many users. But there should be only one collaboration between a specific user and a specific product. –  Questor Feb 7 '13 at 18:44
    
If I understand this properly, user.collaborators.first.try(:hours_spent) would give me the first collaboration for that user. Is there some rails magic that makes it the the first collaboration for that user for a specific product? –  Questor Feb 7 '13 at 21:20
    
Ok, if a single user can only have one product, then on user, both the has_many ... and has_many ... :through should be has_one ... and has_one ... :through which is what @meagar and I were telling you. Then hours spent would be user.collaborator.try(:hours_spent). Same with product if a single product can only be associated with a single user, but I doubt that is the case. –  Gary S. Weaver Feb 7 '13 at 22:18

Perhaps you should use has_and_belongs_to_many. If your Collaborator is used only to make link between User and Product without having more fields.

    class Product < ActiveRecord::Base
       has_and_belongs_to_many :users
    end

    class User < ActiveRecord::Base
       has_and_belongs_to_many :products
   end

The beetween migration would be:

class CreateUsersProducts < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def change
    create_table "users_products", :id => false do |t|
      t.integer :user_id
      t.integer :product_id
    end
  end
end
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

After implementing this, what I found was that I think I had the correct relationships setup, I had to use the has_many :though as users could have many products, and it needed to be :through because there are additional attributes on the collaborator table. The sticking point was how to get there to only be a single Collaborator record for each user/product pair, and then how do I guarantee I got it. And to this point the answer I've found is it has to be done in code.

To make sure there is only a single record for each pair, I used

class Collaborator < ActiveRecord::Base
  validates :product_id, :presence => true,  :uniqueness => {:scope => [:user_id], :message => "This is a duplicate join"}

And then to make doubly sure I'm finding the right record, I have a scope

 scope :collaboration_instance, lambda {|p_id, u_id| where("collaborations.product_id = ? && collaborations.user_id = ?", p_id, u_id)}

If someone has a more elegant solution, or just wants to improve this one, please post and I will change yours to the selected answer.

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