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I want to determine whether my application being run for the first time, and so it will be hard to pass around it.

The preferences or empty file approaches are not going to work because you can simply clear the application data or delete the empty file.

Also I want to do it offline so no server checking is going to work either.

Maybe it's possible to add some code to the installation of the apk so it will only run once.

So my best bet is spawning a lot of empty files all around and hope the user won't find them, but this is pretty messy.

Has anyone ever done this somehow before? Any suggestions?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The preferences or empty file approaches are not going to work because you can simply clear the application data or delete the empty file.

One possibility is to have a BroadcastReceiver, registered in your manifest, that you do not actually use for anything. On first run of your app, disable that receiver via PackageManager and setComponentEnabledSetting(). On future runs, you can determine if that BroadcastReceiver is already disabled via PackageManager and getReceiverInfo().

If the user uninstalls and reinstalls the app, the app will return to its original state. Rooted device users can also get past this. Otherwise, this should be reasonably solid.

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Very clever solution –  David Caunt Feb 7 '13 at 18:39
    
It is a nice a solution but if the user updates the app, then it will also return to its orginal state. If thats ok with the asker, then a global static variables can be used to achieve the same thing. No? –  Snake Feb 7 '13 at 18:46
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@Snake: "It is a nice a solution but if the user updates the app, then it will also return to its orginal state" -- I'm not certain about that, though it's a possibility. I would expect that if the component is named the same, that the enabled/disabled status would persist past an upgrade. It would definitely need to be tested. "then a global static variables can be used to achieve the same thing. No?" -- no, because static data members get cleared when the process is terminated, which happens all of the time. The enabled/disabled setting is persistent. –  CommonsWare Feb 7 '13 at 18:49
    
Thank you for the information –  Snake Feb 7 '13 at 18:52
    
Thanks!! It works great!! –  Vladp Feb 10 '13 at 12:22
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I know you said you dont want files, but if you create them as local internal storage then the user can not delete them as they wont have access unless it is rooted phone. Clearing data "may" delete them.

There is another solution but it is lengthy one. Use SQLite database.IT is local and I dont think it can be deleted otherwise the whole application will crash

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A SQLite database is a file. It will be deleted when the user clears data (internal storage) or via any file manager (external storage). –  CommonsWare Feb 7 '13 at 18:16
    
@CommonsWare, absolutely. I didn't know that, I just tried it and indeed it deletes it. Thanks for the info –  Snake Feb 7 '13 at 18:41
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