Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'm using ASP.NET MVC.

I need a regular expression that allows only numbers and letters, not spaces or ",.;:~^" anything like that. Plain numbers and letters.

Another thing: 2 characters can't repeat consecutively.

So I can have 123123 but not 1123456.

I got as far as to:

Regex ER1 = new Regex(@"(.)\\1", RegexOptions.None);

Regex ER2 = new Regex(@"[A-Z0-9]", RegexOptions.IgnoreCase);

I could not make it all in one expression and I still have some characters passing through.

Here is my entire code for testing:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        string input = Console.ReadLine();

        Regex ER1 = new Regex(@"(.)\\1", RegexOptions.None);

        Regex ER2 = new Regex(@"[A-Z0-9]", RegexOptions.IgnoreCase);

        if (!ER1.IsMatch(input) && ER2.IsMatch(input))
            Console.WriteLine( "Casou");
        else
            Console.WriteLine( "Não casou");

            Console.ReadLine();
    }
}

I find these expressions quite complex and I'd be really happy to have some help with this.

share|improve this question
3  
It sounds like your making evil password restrictions. Don't do that. – SLaks Feb 7 '13 at 18:21
    
Well, I actually have no idea how the code is going to be used. My boss needs it. I do it. Simple as that :D But if I were to guess now that you mentioned it, I kinda think that's what he needs it for. LOL how did you know man? – Cesar Zapata Feb 7 '13 at 18:24
up vote 9 down vote accepted

Let's try this:

@"^(([0-9A-Z])(?!\2))*$"

Explained:

^               start of string
 (              group #1
   ([0-9A-Z])   a digit or a letter (group #2)
   (?!\2)      not followed by what is captured by second group ([0-9A-Z])
 )*             any number of these
$               end of string

 

The ?! group is called a negative lookahead assertion.

 

(LastCoder's expression is equivalent)

share|improve this answer
    
You have an extra backslash – SLaks Feb 7 '13 at 18:33
    
Oops, started with an ordinary string – Pavel Anossov Feb 7 '13 at 18:36
    
Yours didn't work either man. Regex ER = new Regex(@"^(([0-9A-Z])(?!\\2))*$", RegexOptions.None); Does not let me type letters. But thanks anyways – Cesar Zapata Feb 7 '13 at 18:37
    
IgnoreCase man, also note I fixed my extra `\` – Pavel Anossov Feb 7 '13 at 18:38
1  
Sorry, I'm here for the regexps, not the C#. You do have unbalanced parentheses though in your comment: [RegularExpression(@"^(([0-9A-Z])(?!\2))*$")] – Pavel Anossov Feb 7 '13 at 19:12

Something like this should work

@"^(?:([A-Z0-9])(?!\1))*$"
share|improve this answer
    
I tested it this way and it didn't work: I don't know if I'm doing something wrong. static void Main(string[] args) { string input = Console.ReadLine(); Regex ER = new Regex(@"^(?:([A-Z0-9])(?!\1))*$", RegexOptions.None); if (ER.IsMatch(input)) Console.WriteLine( "Casou"); else Console.WriteLine( "Não casou"); Console.ReadLine(); } It does not accepts letter this way. Only numbers. But dots and comas are also blocked. – Cesar Zapata Feb 7 '13 at 18:35
1  
You forgot IgnoreCase – Pavel Anossov Feb 7 '13 at 18:36
    
Oh. Ok. I got that. Now this is almost perfect. The only thing missing is the "no-repeat" thing. For example. If I type 123123 it should pass, but not if I write 1233. It should not let me repeat 2 characters consecutively. – Cesar Zapata Feb 7 '13 at 18:41
    
Your answer works perfectly in the example I gave above. But I could not make it work as an attribute. Why is that so? [Required(ErrorMessage = "Required")] [RegularExpression(@"^(([0-9A-Z])(?!\2))*$", ErrorMessage = "Required")] – Cesar Zapata Feb 7 '13 at 19:13

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.