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I have two classes: Flashcards and Sets. Flashcard is in one of seven stages - each stage should have a TimeSpan property. The goal is to show cards after a certain timespan, depending on the Stage that the card is in.

A set is also in one of those seven stages - the lowest stage among all cards.

Both classes currently have a "public int Stage" property, but I feel like this isn't ideal.

What would be the appropriate way to model this, in terms of class/object definitions? I'm working with MVC4 EF CodeFirst, in case it matters.

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1 Answer 1

State machine: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/State_pattern.

Basically, you have a state ring (all of your states implement one interface). Then you have your state shifter class implement a 'participant' interface, like so:

// All stages should implement this
interface IStateRing
{

}

// Everything participating in the state ring should implement this
interface IStateRingParticipant
{
    void SetStage(IStateRing stage);
}

Your participant class' only job is to respond to changes in state when teh state tells it to, like so:

class MyStageParticipant : IStateRingParticipant
{
    // Keep track of the current state.
    IStateRing currentStage;

    // This is called by the state when it's time to change
    public void SetStage(IStateRing stage)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }
}

Notice it keeps track of what state it's in, and then has a function SetStage which is called by the current state. Next we have our states:

// The state handles the actual functionality, and when it's good and ready
// it commands the participant to change states.
class StateA : IStateRing
{
    // Keep track of the participant.
    IStateRingParticipant participant;

    // The constructor should know what object belongs to this state.
    // that is, which object is participating.
    public StateA(IStateRingParticipant participant)
    {
        this.participant = participant;
    }

    // We do all of our processing in this state.
    // Then when it's time we simply let go of the participant and 
    // instantiate a new state.
    public void GoodAndReady()
    {
        new StateB(participant);
    }
}

class StateB : IStateRing
{
    IStateRingParticipant participant;

    public StateB(IStateRingParticipant participant)
    {
        this.participant = participant;
    }
}

Notice that part of the constructor is that it accepts a participant. The state manages all of the actual processing, and then when it's good and ready, it instantiates the next state (which also holds on to the current state) and so on.

With the state pattern, you route all of the functionality to the state, and then let them figure out when states should change (by instantiating new instances of the states).

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