Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

How can I set (almost) all local variables in an object's method to be attributes of that object?

class Obj(object):
    def do_something(self):
        localstr = 'hello world'
        localnum = 1
        #TODO store vars in the object for easier inspection

x = Obj()
x.do_something()
print x.localstr, x.localnum
share|improve this question
1  
Why would you do something like that? If you want them to be instance attributes simply use self.localstr. – Bakuriu Feb 7 '13 at 19:14
    
@Bakuriu for quick prototyping, inspection, and debugging. But why not ask: Why use self. everywhere in your method when you can simply do the above? :-) Of course, there are good reasons for both ways, and for any library code I would be doing a more discriminate job. – Pat Feb 8 '13 at 6:52
1  
I want to see you debugging something with this when you have a complex class. Different methods will probably partially override other methods "local variables" and you'll end up with tons of instance variables that don't mean anything. Ther is a python debugger that lets you inspect local variables, so there is really no need for this. – Bakuriu Feb 8 '13 at 6:58

Inspired by Python update object from dictionary, I came up with the following:

class Obj(object):
    def do_something(self):
        localstr = 'hello world'
        localnum = 1

        # store vars in the object for easier inspection
        l = locals().copy()
        del l['self']
        for key,value in l.iteritems():
            setattr(self, key, value)

x = Obj()
x.do_something()
print x.localstr, x.localnum
share|improve this answer

There is already a python debugger that let you inspect local variables, so there is no point in polluting the objects with random instance attributes.

Also your approach does not work if more than one method use the same local variable names, since it would be possible that a method overwrites some of the instance attributes, leaving the state of the object in an ambiguous state.

Also your solution goes against the DRY principle, since you must add the code before every return.

An other disadvantage is that often you want to know the state of the local variables in more than one place during method execution, and this is not possible with your answer.

If you really want to save the local variables manually, then something like this is probably much better than your solution:

import inspect
from collections import defaultdict



class LogLocals(object):

    NO_BREAK_POINT = object()

    def __init__(self):
        self.__locals = defaultdict(defaultdict(list))

    def register_locals(self, local_vars, method_name=None, 
                              break_point=NO_BREAK_POINT):
        if method_name is None:
            method_name = inspect.currentframe(1).f_code.co_name
        self.__locals[method_name][break_point].append(local_vars)

    def reset_locals(self, method_name=None, break_point=NO_BREAK_POINT,
                           all_=False):
        if method_name is None:
            method_name = inspect.currentframe(1).f_code.co_name
        if all_:
            del self.__locals[method_name]
        else:
            del self.__locals[method_name][point]

    def get_locals(self, method_name, break_point=NO_BREAK_POINT):
        return self.__locals[method_name][break_point]

You simply have inherit from it and call register_locals(locals()) when you want to save the state. It also allow to distinguish between "break points" and most importantly it does not pollute the instances. Also it distinguish between different calls returning a list of states instead of the last state.

If you want to access the locals of some call via attributes you can simply do something like:

class SimpleNamespace(object):  # python3.3 already provides this
    def __init__(self, attrs):
        self.__dict__.update(attrs)

the_locals = x.get_locals('method_1')[-1]   # take only last call locals
x = SimpleNamespace(the_locals)
x.some_local_variable

Anyway, I believe there is no much use for this. You ought to use the python debugger.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.