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I don't have a decent text editor on this server, but I need to see what's causing an error on line 10 of a certain file. I do have PowerShell though...

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3  
what about (get-content myfile.txt)[9] ? –  CB. Feb 7 '13 at 19:47
    
excellent alternative! –  northben Feb 7 '13 at 19:51
    
yes, the problem is that with big files can be really slow, 'cause all the file is read before return the [index] –  CB. Feb 7 '13 at 20:10

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

This will show the 10th line of myfile.txt:

get-content myfile.txt | select -first 1 -skip 9

both -first and -skip are optional parameters, and -context, or -last may be useful in similar situations.

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It's as easy as using select:

Get-Content file.txt | Select -Index (line - 1)

E.g. to get line 5

Get-Content file.txt | Select -Index 4

Or you can use:

(Get-Content file.txt)[4]
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Here's a function that uses .NET's System.IO classes directly:

function GetLineAt([String] $path, [Int32] $index)
{
    [System.IO.FileMode] $mode = [System.IO.FileMode]::Open;
    [System.IO.FileAccess] $access = [System.IO.FileAccess]::Read;
    [System.IO.FileShare] $share = [System.IO.FileShare]::Read;
    [Int32] $bufferSize = 16 * 1024;
    [System.IO.FileOptions] $options = [System.IO.FileOptions]::SequentialScan;
    [System.Text.Encoding] $defaultEncoding = [System.Text.Encoding]::UTF8;
    # FileStream(String, FileMode, FileAccess, FileShare, Int32, FileOptions) constructor
    # http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/d0y914c5.aspx
    [System.IO.FileStream] $input = New-Object `
        -TypeName 'System.IO.FileStream' `
        -ArgumentList ($path, $mode, $access, $share, $bufferSize, $options);
    # StreamReader(Stream, Encoding, Boolean, Int32) constructor
    # http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/ms143458.aspx
    [System.IO.StreamReader] $reader = New-Object `
        -TypeName 'System.IO.StreamReader' `
        -ArgumentList ($input, $defaultEncoding, $true, $bufferSize);
    [String] $line = $null;
    [Int32] $currentIndex = 0;

    try
    {
        while (($line = $reader.ReadLine()) -ne $null)
        {
            if ($currentIndex++ -eq $index)
            {
                return $line;
            }
        }
    }
    finally
    {
        # Close $reader and $input
        $reader.Close();
    }

    # There are less than ($index + 1) lines in the file
    return $null;
}

GetLineAt 'file.txt' 9;

Tweaking the $bufferSize variable might affect performance. A more concise version that uses default buffer sizes and doesn't provide optimization hints could look like this:

function GetLineAt([String] $path, [Int32] $index)
{
    # StreamReader(String, Boolean) constructor
    # http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/9y86s1a9.aspx
    [System.IO.StreamReader] $reader = New-Object `
        -TypeName 'System.IO.StreamReader' `
        -ArgumentList ($path, $true);
    [String] $line = $null;
    [Int32] $currentIndex = 0;

    try
    {
        while (($line = $reader.ReadLine()) -ne $null)
        {
            if ($currentIndex++ -eq $index)
            {
                return $line;
            }
        }
    }
    finally
    {
        $reader.Close();
    }

    # There are less than ($index + 1) lines in the file
    return $null;
}

GetLineAt 'file.txt' 9;
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1  
Overengineering: See BACON's solution on SO for a quick way to read a text file. :) –  northben Feb 8 '13 at 16:30
    
Well, you didn't ask for a quick way... –  BACON Feb 8 '13 at 16:38
1  
I stumbled on this question while looking for how to do this for a large file - exactly what I needed. –  Tao Oct 22 '13 at 13:08
    
@Tao Thank you. Glad someone found this useful. Sometimes the built-in PowerShell cmdlets don't give you the control or efficiency you need, especially, like you said, when working with large files. –  BACON Oct 22 '13 at 15:50
    
+1 For Northben's (funny) explanation for overengineering. +1 For Bacon for his effort. –  prabhakaran Mar 26 '14 at 12:27

You can use the -TotalCount parameter of the Get-Content cmdlet to read the first n lines, then use Select-Object to return only the nth line:

Get-Content file.txt -TotalCount 9 | Select-Object -Last 1;

Per the comment from @C.B. this should improve performance by only reading up to and including the nth line, rather than the entire file. Note that you can use the aliases -First or -Head in place of -TotalCount.

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Just for fun, here some test:

#Added this for @Graimer's request ;) (not same computer, but one with HD little more #performant...)

measure-command { Get-Content ita\ita.txt -TotalCount 260000 | Select-Object -Last 1 }

Days              : 0
Hours             : 0

Minutes           : 0
Seconds           : 28
Milliseconds      : 893
Ticks             : 288932649
TotalDays         : 0,000334412788194444
TotalHours        : 0,00802590691666667
TotalMinutes      : 0,481554415
TotalSeconds      : 28,8932649
TotalMilliseconds : 28893,2649


> measure-command { (gc "c:\ps\ita\ita.txt")[260000] }


Days              : 0
Hours             : 0
Minutes           : 0
Seconds           : 9
Milliseconds      : 257
Ticks             : 92572893
TotalDays         : 0,000107144552083333
TotalHours        : 0,00257146925
TotalMinutes      : 0,154288155
TotalSeconds      : 9,2572893
TotalMilliseconds : 9257,2893


> measure-command { ([System.IO.File]::ReadAllLines("c:\ps\ita\ita.txt"))[260000] }


Days              : 0
Hours             : 0
Minutes           : 0
Seconds           : 0
Milliseconds      : 234
Ticks             : 2348059
TotalDays         : 2,71766087962963E-06
TotalHours        : 6,52238611111111E-05
TotalMinutes      : 0,00391343166666667
TotalSeconds      : 0,2348059
TotalMilliseconds : 234,8059



> measure-command {get-content .\ita\ita.txt | select -index 260000}


Days              : 0
Hours             : 0
Minutes           : 0
Seconds           : 36
Milliseconds      : 591
Ticks             : 365912596
TotalDays         : 0,000423509949074074
TotalHours        : 0,0101642387777778
TotalMinutes      : 0,609854326666667
TotalSeconds      : 36,5912596
TotalMilliseconds : 36591,2596

the winner is : ([System.IO.File]::ReadAllLines( path ))[index]

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how about @Bacon 's answer ? since you already have a sample file :-) –  Frode F. Feb 8 '13 at 9:30
    
@Graimer Added :). All this test are intended for seeking in a big file for big index, I think that for little index's value the results may vary. Each test was done in a new powershell session to avoid HD pre-caching features. –  CB. Feb 8 '13 at 9:58
    
I'm really surprised that ReadAllLines() is not only faster, but so much faster than the two uses of Get-Content. As the name suggests, it's reading the entire file, too. Anyways, I posted another approach, if you want to try that one, too. Also, whenever I use Measure-Command to benchmark code I usually run it like this 1..10 | % { Measure-Command { ... } } | Measure-Object TotalMilliseconds -Average -Min -Max -Sum; so I can get a more accurate number from multiple test runs. –  BACON Feb 8 '13 at 16:22

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