Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Our company recently moved to git - the way our process works is we have several bugs we work on at the same time, and these go for review once we've submitted .patch files

Is there a way I can stash just my staged changes? The scenario I'm having issues with is when I've worked on several bugs at a given time, and have several unstaged changes. I'd like to be able to stage these files individually, create my .patch files, and stash them away until the code is approved. This way, when it's approved I can stash my entire (current) session, pop that bug and push the code.

Am I going about this the wrong way? Am I misunderstanding how git can work in other ways to simplify my process?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Is it absolutely necessary to work on several bugs at once? And by "at once," I mean "having files edited for multiple bugs at the same time." Because unless you absolutely need that, I'd only work on one bug at a time in your environment. That way you can use local branches & rebase, which I find far easier than managing a complex stash/stage.

Let's say master is at commit B. Now work on bug #1.

git checkout -b bug1

Now you're on branch bug1. Make some changes, commit, wait for code review. This is local, so you're not affecting anyone else, and it should be easy enough to make a patch from git diffs.

A-B < master
   \
    C < bug1

Now you're working on bug2. Go back to master with git checkout master. Make a new branch, git checkout -b bug2. Make changes, commit, wait for code review.

    D < bug2
   /
A-B < master
   \
    C < bug1

Let's pretend that someone else commits E & F on master while you're waiting on review.

    D < bug2
   /
A-B-E-F < master
   \
    C < bug1

When your code has been approved, you can rebase it on to master with the following steps:

git checkout bug1
git rebase master
git checkout master
git merge bug1

This will result in the following:

    D < bug2
   /
A-B-E-F-C' < master, bug1

Then you can push, delete your local bug1 branch, and off you go. One bug at a time in your workspace, but with using local branches your repository can handle multiple bugs. And this avoids a complicated stage/stash dance.

Answer to ctote's question in the comments:

Well, you can go back to stashing for each bug, and only work with one bug at a time. Atleast that saves you the staging issue. But having tried this, I personally find it troublesome. Stashes are a bit messy in a git log graph. And more importantly, if you screw something up you can't revert. If you have a dirty working directory and you pop a stash, you can't "undo" that pop. It's much harder to screw up already existing commits.

So git rebase -i.

When you rebase one branch onto another, you can do it interactively (the -i flag). When you do this, you have the option to pick what you want to do with each commit. Pro Git is an awesome book which is also online in HTML format, and has a nice section on rebasing & squashing:

http://git-scm.com/book/ch6-4.html

I'll steal their example verbatim for convenience. Pretend you have the following commit history, and you want to rebase & squash bug1 onto master:

    F < bug2
   /
A-B-G-H < master
   \
    C-D-E < bug1

Here's what you will see when you type git rebase -i master bug1

pick f7f3f6d changed my name a bit
pick 310154e updated README formatting and added blame
pick a5f4a0d added cat-file
#
# Commands:
#  p, pick = use commit
#  e, edit = use commit, but stop for amending
#  s, squash = use commit, but meld into previous commit
#
# If you remove a line here THAT COMMIT WILL BE LOST.
# However, if you remove everything, the rebase will be aborted.
#

To squash all commits of a branch down into a single commit, keep the first commit as "pick" and replace all subsequent "pick" entries with "squash" or simply "s". You will get the opportunity to change the commit message, too.

pick f7f3f6d changed my name a bit
s 310154e updated README formatting and added blame
s a5f4a0d added cat-file
#
# Commands:
#  p, pick = use commit
#  e, edit = use commit, but stop for amending
#  s, squash = use commit, but meld into previous commit

So yeah, squashing is a bit of a pain, but I would still recommend it over heavy use of stashes.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the detailed post! This solves a lot of my issues for sure - the only problem I see is our current team has requested we keep all deliveries to a single commit. :( –  MrDuk Feb 7 '13 at 21:14
    
If they don't need or want your working history in the production repo that's fine: make your tracking master history-less by applying diffs rather than merging branches. You can work out how to keep a decorated-master branch that has the actual merged history and do your real work from that, that way it'll be easy to automate generating the correct diffs. –  jthill Feb 8 '13 at 1:41
2  
Note that git checkout master; git checkout -b bug2 can be shortened to git checkout -b bug2 master. The same applies to git checkout bug1; git rebase master; git checkout master; git merge bug1, which is identical to git rebase master bug1; git push . bug1:master (granted, the push trick is not obvious) –  knittl Feb 8 '13 at 14:11
    
Thanks for the tipps, knittl –  Mike Monkiewicz Feb 8 '13 at 14:30
1  
I gave a walkthrough for stashing above in the main answer so I could use fancy formatting –  Mike Monkiewicz Feb 8 '13 at 19:23

Why don't you commit the change for a certain bug and create a patch from that commit and its predecessor?

# hackhackhack, fix two unrelated bugs
git add -p                   # add hunks of first bug
git commit -m 'fix bug #123' # create commit #1
git add -p                   # add hunks of second bug
git commit -m 'fix bug #321' # create commit #2

Then, to create the appropriate patches, use git format-patch:

git format-patch HEAD^^

This will create two files: 0001-fix-bug-123.patch and 0002-fix-bug-321.patch

Or you can create separate branches for each bug, so you can merge or rebase bug fixes individually, or even delete them, if they don't work out.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.