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Say I have a WPF application (exe) that has this in the MainWindow.xaml:

<Grid>
    <extraControls:MyMVVMUserControl MyDependencyProperty="{Binding Something}"/>
    <extraControls:MyUserControl MyDependencyProperty="{Binding Something}" />
</Grid>

and my MainWindow.xaml.cs looks like this:

public MainWindow()
{
    DataContext = new MainWindowVM();
    InitializeComponent();
}

And my MainWindowVM.cs has a property setup for Something that notifies on property changed.

The user controls are made in a separate dll. As you may guess, MyMVVMUserControl has the DataContext set to a view model.

public MyMVVMUserControl()
{
    DataContext = new MyMVVMUserControlVM();
    InitializeComponent();
}

MyUserControl does not have a DataContext set in the code behind.

So the interesting thing is that they both have MyDependencyProperty setup exactly the same.

But the MVVM version does not work.

After digging in a bit, I found that the {Binding Something} in MainWindow.xaml is using the View Model setup for the MyMVVMUserControl as the DataContext (rather than the DataContext set in MainWindow.cs (set to MainWindowVM)).

And my question is why?

Why would WPF look inside the user control and use it's DataContext for a binding that is in the actual application?

(NOTE: I know I can get around this by setting the source in the binding, but I want others to be able to use my user controls. But with this issue, I now have a built-in "gotcha" for anyone I want to use my user controls.)

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2  
I highly recommend Snoop to inspect the running application and see what the DataContext for each element is. –  HighCore Feb 7 '13 at 20:15
    
Also, InitalizeComponent() should go first. –  HighCore Feb 7 '13 at 20:16
    
If InitalizeComponent is first then any controls that need the CataContext will not have it... Right? –  Vaccano Feb 7 '13 at 20:23
    
@HighCore - Thanks for the pointer for Snoop. I will look at it. But in this case I put a PresentationTraceSources.TraceLevel=High in my binding. That clearly told me that the DataContext for the binding in MainWindow.xaml was using the User Control's DataContext. –  Vaccano Feb 7 '13 at 20:27

2 Answers 2

I think I understand you problem, and I'm gonna to give a solution that works for me (I had this problem before). The think is that seams that you are setting the DataContext for you MyMVVMUserControl in code behind, and then it take the bindings from that.

The solution I found for this, is to set the datacontext in code behind, but not at the user control. Set the datacontext for the UserControl's child item. For instance, supose this is the Xaml of your UserControl:

<UserControl ... x:Name="userControl">
    <Grid x:Name="rootContainer">
         ...
    </Grid>
</UserControl>

Then in the code behind set the rootContainer's data context, in this way all visual children can access to the control data context, and also the user control datacontext is empty.

...
rootContainer.DataContext = new UserControlViewModel();
...

Hope this may helps you to solve your issues...

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You really shouldn't ever set the DataContext of a UserControl from inside the UserControl. By doing so, you are preventing any other DataContext from getting passed to the UserControl, which defeats one of WPF's biggest advantages of having separate UI and data layers.

WPF objects only inherit their DataContext from the parent object if the DataContext is not set to anything else. When your MyMVVMUserControl is being created, you are setting the DataContext to a new MyMVVMUserControlVM, which prevents the DataContext from being inherited from MainWindow.

So its normal that your MVVMUserControl would have it's DataContext set to your MyMVVMUserControlVM, because you set it explicitly in the UserControl's constructor.

This is by-design. UI objects in WPF/MVVM are only meant to be visual representations of the data layer, so it wouldn't make much sense to set the data layer and then try to bind your properties to something that is not on the data layer.

For example, take this line of code:

 <UserControl DataContext="{Binding ClassA}" Content="{Binding Name}" />

This would bind the Content property to UserControl.DataContext.Name, which is ClassA.Name. It wouldn't make much sense if this would result in binding to UserControl.Parent.DataContext.Name, as the binding should refer to to the current object's DataContext, and not the Parent's DataContext.

So the only time I ever set the DataContext of a UserControl from inside the UserControl itself is if the UserControl is its own separate object that is never meant to interact with data from the rest of the application. Which so far has been never :)

Typically my UserControls are almost always one of two things:

  • Either a visual representation of a ViewModel (or Model), such as a CustomerUserControl for a CustomerViewModel, in which case I pass them the DataContext they need when they get used

    For example,

    <local:CustomerUserControl DataContext="{Binding SelectedCustomer}" />
    

    or

    <DataTemplate DataType="{x:Type local:CustomerModel}">
        <local:CustomerUserControl />
    </DataTemplate>
    
  • Or a self-sustained UI object that receives any external data it needs via custom DependencyProperties, and does any additional logic in the code-behind the control, such as a DatePicker control that has a SelectedDate dependency property, or a CalculatorUserControl with dependency properties for Equation and Value

    <local:DatePickerUserControl SelectedDate="{Binding SomeDate}" />
    
    <local:CalculatorUserControl Equation="{Binding SomeString}" 
                                 Value="{Binding SomeDouble}" />
    

In your case, it sounds like you should be using the first case, and should be passing a ViewModel into your UserControl containing the data it needs.

<extraControls:MyMVVMUserControl DataContext="{Binding MyMVVMUserControlVM}"
                                 MyDependencyProperty="{Binding Something}">

or

<extraControls:MyMVVMUserControl MyDependencyProperty="{Binding Something}">
    <extraControls:MyMVVMUserControl.DataContext>
        <viewModels:MyMVVMUserControlVM />
    </extraControls:MyMVVMUserControl.DataContext>
<extraControls:MyMVVMUserControl />
share|improve this answer
    
Hmmm, I must not be getting the point of it. I have a user control that models the UI for entering data for a specific object. But it is complex and not everything I need is in the Object. So, I was trying to pass in the object as a dependency property and then use a View Model (in the User Control) to run the UI, logic and commands... –  Vaccano Feb 7 '13 at 20:29
    
@Vaccano I've updated my answer. My UserControls are almost always one of two things. They can be a visual representation of a ViewModel (or Model), such as a CustomerUserControl for a CustomerViewModel, in which case I pass them the DataContext they need when they get used. Or they can be self-sustained UI objects that receive any data they need via custom DependencyProperties, such as a DatePicker control that has a SelectedDate dependency property. It sounds like you should be using the first case, and should be passing a ViewModel into your UserControl containing the data it needs. –  Rachel Feb 7 '13 at 20:39

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