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Struggling to find anyone experiencing a similar issue or anything similar.

I'm currently consuming a stream over http (json) which has a GZip requirement, and I am experiencing a delay from when the data is sent, to when reader.ReadLine() reads it. It has been suggested to me that this could be related to the decoding keeping back data in a buffer?

This is what I have currently, it works fine apart from the delay.

HttpWebRequest request = (HttpWebRequest)WebRequest.Create(endPoint);
request.Method = "GET";

request.PreAuthenticate = true;
request.Credentials = new NetworkCredential(username, password);

request.AutomaticDecompression = DecompressionMethods.GZip;
request.ContentType = "application/json";
request.Accept = "application/json";
request.Timeout = 30;
request.BeginGetResponse(AsyncCallback, request);

Then inside the AsyncCallback method I have:

HttpWebRequest request = result.AsyncState as HttpWebRequest;

using (HttpWebResponse response = (HttpWebResponse)request.EndGetResponse(result))
using (Stream stream = response.GetResponseStream())
using (StreamReader reader = new StreamReader(stream, Encoding.UTF8))
{

    while (!reader.EndOfStream)
    {
        string line = reader.ReadLine();
        if (string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(line)) continue;

        Console.WriteLine(line);
    }
}

It just sits on reader.Readline() until more data is received, and then even holds back some of that. There are also keep-alive newlines received, these are often are read out all at once when it does decide to read something.

I have tested the stream running side by side with a curl command running, the curl command receives and decompresses the data perfectly fine.

Any insight would be terrific. Thanks,

Dan

EDIT Had no luck using the buffer size on streamreader.

new StreamReader(stream, Encoding.UTF8, true, 1)

EDIT Also had no luck updating to .NET 4.5 and using

request.AllowReadStreamBuffering = false;
share|improve this question
    
Hmm..why not use reader.ReadToEnd()? –  JerKimball Feb 7 '13 at 20:37
    
It's a http stream, kept open over a very long period of time. So I need to handle each line as it comes in. I beleive .ReadToEnd() will just wait until EndOfStream is received? Which isn't likely to happen. –  Dan Saltmer Feb 7 '13 at 20:39
    
Ah, so it's a keep-alive style connection where you'd get incremental responses back? –  JerKimball Feb 7 '13 at 20:43
    
@Dan - try request.AutomaticDecompression = DecompressionMethods.GZip | DecompressionMethods.Deflate; and lmk! –  AppDeveloper Feb 7 '13 at 21:10
    
@AppDeveloper no luck I'm afraid, I know it's explicitly using gzip though. Which I have a feeling is where the delay is being introduced. –  Dan Saltmer Feb 7 '13 at 21:18

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Update: This seems to have issues over long periods of time with higher rates of volume, and should only be used on small volume where the buffer is impacting the application's functionality. I have since switched back to a StreamReader.

So this is what I ended up coming up with. This works, without the delay. This does not get buffered by automated GZip decompression.

using (HttpWebResponse response = (HttpWebResponse)request.EndGetResponse(result))
using (Stream stream = response.GetResponseStream())
using (MemoryStream memory = new MemoryStream())
using (GZipStream gzip = new GZipStream(memory, CompressionMode.Decompress))
{
    byte[] compressedBuffer = new byte[8192];
    byte[] uncompressedBuffer = new byte[8192];
    List<byte> output = new List<byte>();

    while (stream.CanRead)
    {
        int readCount = stream.Read(compressedBuffer, 0, compressedBuffer.Length);

        memory.Write(compressedBuffer.Take(readCount).ToArray(), 0, readCount);
        memory.Position = 0;

        int uncompressedLength = gzip.Read(uncompressedBuffer, 0, uncompressedBuffer.Length);

        output.AddRange(uncompressedBuffer.Take(uncompressedLength));

        if (!output.Contains(0x0A)) continue;

        byte[] bytesToDecode = output.Take(output.LastIndexOf(0x0A) + 1).ToArray();
        string outputString = Encoding.UTF8.GetString(bytesToDecode);
        output.RemoveRange(0, bytesToDecode.Length);

        string[] lines = outputString.Split(new[] { Environment.NewLine }, new StringSplitOptions());
        for (int i = 0; i < (lines.Length - 1); i++)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(lines[i]);
        }

        memory.SetLength(0);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

There may be something to the Delayed ACK C.Evenhuis discusses, but I've got a weird gut feeling it's the StreamReader that's causing you headaches...you might try something like this:

public void AsyncCallback(IAsyncResult result)
{
    HttpWebRequest request = result.AsyncState as HttpWebRequest;   
    using (HttpWebResponse response = (HttpWebResponse)request.EndGetResponse(result))
    using (Stream stream = response.GetResponseStream())
    {
        var buffer = new byte[2048];
        while(stream.CanRead)
        {
            var readCount = stream.Read(buffer, 0, buffer.Length);
            var line = Encoding.UTF8.GetString(buffer.Take(readCount).ToArray());
            Console.WriteLine(line);
        }
    }
}

EDIT: Here's the full harness I used to test this theory (maybe the difference from your situation will jump out at you)

(LINQPad-ready)

void Main()
{
    Task.Factory.StartNew(() => Listener());
    _blocker.WaitOne();
    Request();
}

public bool _running;
public ManualResetEvent _blocker = new ManualResetEvent(false);

public void Listener()
{
    var listener = new HttpListener();
    listener.Prefixes.Add("http://localhost:8080/");
    listener.Start();
    "Listener is listening...".Dump();;
    _running = true;
    _blocker.Set();
    var ctx = listener.GetContext();
    "Listener got context".Dump();
    ctx.Response.KeepAlive = true;
    ctx.Response.ContentType = "application/json";
    var outputStream = ctx.Response.OutputStream;
    using(var zipStream = new GZipStream(outputStream, CompressionMode.Compress))
    using(var writer = new StreamWriter(outputStream))
    {
        var lineCount = 0;
        while(_running && lineCount++ < 10)
        {
            writer.WriteLine("{ \"foo\": \"bar\"}");
            "Listener wrote line, taking a nap...".Dump();
            writer.Flush();
            Thread.Sleep(1000);
        }
    }
    listener.Stop();
}

public void Request()
{
    var endPoint = "http://localhost:8080";
    var username = "";
    var password = "";
    HttpWebRequest request = (HttpWebRequest)WebRequest.Create(endPoint);
    request.Method = "GET";

    request.PreAuthenticate = true;
    request.Credentials = new NetworkCredential(username, password);

    request.AutomaticDecompression = DecompressionMethods.GZip;
    request.ContentType = "application/json";
    request.Accept = "application/json";
    request.Timeout = 30;
    request.BeginGetResponse(AsyncCallback, request);
}

public void AsyncCallback(IAsyncResult result)
{
    Console.WriteLine("In AsyncCallback");    
    HttpWebRequest request = result.AsyncState as HttpWebRequest;    
    using (HttpWebResponse response = (HttpWebResponse)request.EndGetResponse(result))
    using (Stream stream = response.GetResponseStream())
    {
        while(stream.CanRead)
        {
            var buffer = new byte[2048];
            var readCount = stream.Read(buffer, 0, buffer.Length);
            var line = Encoding.UTF8.GetString(buffer.Take(readCount).ToArray());
            Console.WriteLine("Reader got:" + line);
        }
    }
}

Output:

Listener is listening...
Listener got context
Listener wrote line, taking a nap...
In AsyncCallback
Reader got:{ "foo": "bar"}

Listener wrote line, taking a nap...
Reader got:{ "foo": "bar"}

Listener wrote line, taking a nap...
Reader got:{ "foo": "bar"}

Listener wrote line, taking a nap...
Reader got:{ "foo": "bar"}

Listener wrote line, taking a nap...
Reader got:{ "foo": "bar"}

Listener wrote line, taking a nap...
Reader got:{ "foo": "bar"}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, but no luck. Same behavior, when the line came through it had multiple bits of data in it which had been waited. I think the issue lies with the gzip somewhere. –  Dan Saltmer Feb 7 '13 at 21:20
    
Hmm...odd, I threw together a quick harness to test this and saw what I think you're after...let me append the full harness to my answer. –  JerKimball Feb 7 '13 at 21:26
1  
That's actually really useful, it replicates the issue I am having. With two minor changes to your code to fix it. Pass the GZipStream to the writer. And add ctx.Response.AddHeader("Content-Encoding", "gzip"); –  Dan Saltmer Feb 7 '13 at 21:41
    
Hah - yeah, those two changes would make a difference... :) Let me give it a think, if I come up with anything I'll augment this answer. –  JerKimball Feb 7 '13 at 21:47
    
This is the output using your listener and your code. screencast.com/t/Po5WbK4eVw1 –  Dan Saltmer Feb 7 '13 at 21:48

This may have to do with Delayed ACK in combination with Nagle's algorithm. It occurs when the server sends multiple small responses in a row.

On the server side, the first response is sent, but subsequent response data chunks are only sent when the server has received an ACK from the client, or until there is enough data for a big packet to send (Nagle's algorithm).

On the client side, the first bit of response is received, but the ACK is not sent immediately - since traditional applications have a request-response-request-response behavior, it assumes it can send the ACK along with the next request - which in your case does not happen.

After a fixed amount of time (500ms?) it decides to send the ACK anyway, causing the server to send the next packages it has accumulated sofar.

The problem (if this is indeed the problem you're experiencing) can be fixed on the server side at the socket level by setting the NoDelay property, disabling Nagle's algorithm. I think you can also disable it operating system wide.

You could also temporarily disable Delayed ACK (I know windows has a registry entry for it) on the client side to see if this is indeed the problem, without having to change anything on your server. Delayed ACK prevents DDOS attacks, so make sure you restore the setting afterwards.

Sending keepalives less frequently may also help, but you'll still have a chance for the problem to occur.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the response but this doesn't seem like the issue. I also don't have access to the server. The server is proven to work for other languages, and I have no issues running the connection in curl, that receives every line as it comes. Disabling Nagle's locally has no effect. I'm going to investigate an approach without HttpWebRequest for the time being though. –  Dan Saltmer Feb 7 '13 at 21:06
    
If this was the problem, it would be the server's Nagle causing the issues. Too bad I coulnd't help you out, good luck. –  C.Evenhuis Feb 7 '13 at 21:07

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